Tag: 419SH龙凤

gecknqrd

This super house plant scrubs pollutants from your home

first_img 16 Photos Sci-Tech More plants Plant-robot hybrid can make its own way to sunny spots The best indoor plants to bring the outside in How to water your plants while you’re away According to the study, the unmodified plants didn’t affect the concentration of either gas much. But the modified plants changed the concentration of chloroform dramatically inside the tube, making it drop by 82 percent just after three days. By the sixth day, it was almost completely undetectable. The concentration of benzene also decreased thanks to the modified plants. By day eight, it dropped by an impressive 75 percent.”People haven’t really been talking about these hazardous organic compounds in homes, and I think that’s because we couldn’t do anything about them,” study author Stuart Strand said in a statement. “Now we’ve engineered houseplants to remove these pollutants for us.”The research team plans to add a protein to pothos plants that can break down another hazardous pollutant inside some homes: formaldehyde. This harmful compound is often found in wood flooring and cabinets. Tags Plug in your plants with these 15 connected garden gadgets (pictures)center_img Post a comment 0 CNET’s Holiday Gift Guide: The best place to find the perfect gift for everyone on your list this season.Culture: Your hub for everything from film and television to music, comics, toys and sports. Houseplants do more than just add natural beauty to your abode. They also help clean the air.Enlarge ImageA University of Washington scientist tests genetically modified pothos ivy to see how fast the plant can break down harmful chemicals. Mark Stone/University of Washington Now, researchers at the University of Washington have improved the air-cleaning properties of one common household plant, the pothos ivy (epipremnum aureum).The team genetically modified pothos ivy to not only remove carcinogens such as chloroform and benzene from the air, but to synthesize a protein, called 2E1, that transforms these harmful compounds into molecules the plants use for their own growth.The researchers chose pothos ivy as the plant for modification because it grows well indoors in a variety of conditions. They detail their work in a new study published this week in Environmental Science & Technology. The scientists added benzene or chloroform gas to modified and non-modified plants in glass tubes. Over 11 days, they collected data on how each pollutant’s concentration changed.  Share your voicelast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
jgwcorbs

Nepal revises plane crash death figure to 49

first_imgPeople light candles in memory of the victims of the US-Bangla aircraft crash in Nepal, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 15 March, 2018. Photo: ReutersThe home ministry of Nepal has corrected the number of deaths in the US Bangla plane crash in Tribhuvan International Airport on Monday afternoon, reports Nepalese newspaper Kathmandu Post.Earlier, the ministry had put the death toll at 51.Rescue workers work at the wreckage of a US-Bangla airplane after it crashed at the Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal 12 March, 2018. Photo: ReutersAccording to the Kathmandu Post, the ministry in a statement on Wednesday said 49 persons including four crewmembers were killed in the crash.Of the dead, 26 were Bangladeshis, 22 Nepalese and one Chinese.last_img

CONTINUE READING
sveqcqvc

Australia road crash kills 3 Bangladeshis

first_imgRoad Accident logoAt least three Bangladeshi nationals were killed on Saturday in a road accident at Kakadu Highway in Darwin, the capital city of Northern Territory of Australia.The accident took place at 12.30pm on Saturday, reports news agency UNB quoting ABC News.Seven young people – all believed to be members of the Top End’s Bangladeshi student community – were travelling from Jabiru to Cooinda in a Toyota Landcruiser on Saturday afternoon when it crashed on the Kakadu Highway.Four women were injured in the crash and are in a stable condition in Royal Darwin hospital, the report said.NT police acting assistant commissioner commander Tony Fuller said the accident occurred when the 29-year-old driver lost control on a large, sweeping bend.Two of the injured people might have limbs amputated, and another had a severe head injury, police said.“The two rear passengers were able to escape, the driver and front passenger were unable to escape, and they have died at the scene,” police said.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
dyekoypw

Heavy rains drench Rohingya camps UNHCR

first_imgA Rohingya refugee repairs the roof of his shelter at the Balukhali refugee camp in Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh, on 5 March 2019. Reuters File PhotoThree days of incessant rains in Bangladesh have destroyed 273 shelters and injured 11 people in Cox’s Bazar Rohingya camps, said UNHCR on Friday. “We remain on high alert, ready to deploy additional emergency response teams to support our network of refugee volunteers and partners as needed,” said UNHCR spokesperson Charlie Yaxley at a press briefing in Geneva, according to UNB. To date, the 2019 Joint Response Plan (JRP) for the Rohingya humanitarian crisis in Bangladesh has received only a third (US$301 million) of the US$920 million that is needed, according to UNHCR.Bangladesh is now hosting over 1.2 million Rohingyas and most of them entered the country since 25 August, 2017 amid military crackdown against them in Rakhine state of Myanmar.Yaxley said an estimated 350mm of rain fell in 72 hours from Monday and more heavy downpours are expected throughout next week, with four months of the monsoon season to go.According to preliminary reports, there have been 26 landslides.Refugee volunteers trained by UNHCR and partners worked throughout the night on Wednesday in heavy rain to help families in urgent need, said the UN Refugee Agency spokesperson.”In some cases, this involved rescuing refugees from shelters destroyed by landslides. We’ve temporarily relocated 2,137 people, either because their shelters suffered substantial damage or as a precaution,” Yaxley said.The spokesperson said their network of Emergency Response Teams has been mobilised to identify the needs of the most vulnerable and prioritise them for assistance. “As an immediate response, pre-positioned emergency supplies are being distributed to help rebuild, repair and strengthen damaged shelters.”In support of the humanitarian response led by the Bangladeshi authorities, UNHCR and partners, including WFP and IOM, made preparedness for the monsoon season a priority, including building retaining structures on hillsides, installing drainage, and building roads and bridges, Yaxley said.Reservoirs have been also constructed to hold monsoon rains and stabilise water supplies, said the spokesperson.last_img
CONTINUE READING
dyekoypw

Uncovered White Pyramid Island Reveals Earliest Clues to Greek Origins

first_imgExciting discoveries on a tiny Greek ‘pyramid’ island in the Aegean Sea are leading to new scientific theories on prehistoric Greece. Excavations on this island, 125 miles from Athens, are revealing the earliest truly monumental complex of buildings ever unearthed in the Greek world. “Dating back 4,600 years, the site may also have been part of the inspiration for a key aspect of Greek religion – the idea that mountain tops were the dwelling places of the gods,” according to The Independent.In this remote and uninhabited pyramid-shaped islet, archaeologists discovered evidence of a rich cultural landscape dating to a time earlier than the Minoan age. The evidence indicates this was a major religious center created with technical knowledge pre-dating that found at Minoan Knossos by at least 400 years. This supports its playing a role in the development of Greek civilization.The pyramid islet of Dhaskalio with Keros in the foreground (Courtesy of Cambridge Keros Project)Archaeologists recently competed a four-year study of a site in the Aegean Sea called Dhaskalio. The architectural features include stairways and drainage systems that re-shaped the islet, which confirms that Dhaskalio was home to an advanced civilization.AdChoices广告inRead invented by TeadsResearchers believe that these ancient architects “terra-formed” the pyramid-shaped island “mini-mountain,” known in recent centuries as Dhaskalio, to create around 1,000m of artificial terracing, arranged in six “steps” on its steep slopes.Another view of Dhaskalio islet. Photo by Zde CC by SA-3.0They constructed what is thought to have been a huge religious sanctuary consisting of up to 60 marble buildings, which were created specifically to glisten in the sun.Dhaskalio has been the subject of intense archaeological study since 2015, when this site was located. The research is being carried out by a multinational team, supported by the Greek government and the British School in Athens. Several international institutes provide funding. The Dhaskalio promontory is a tiny island created by rising sea levels, but 4,500 years ago it was attached by a narrow causeway to Keros, now uninhabited and a protected site. In the 3rd millennium BC, Keros was a place where complex rituals were enacted and where archaeological excavations have turned up fascinating and bizarre statues from the ancient Cycladic civilization, of which Dhaskalio would have been a part.Ancient Cycladic sculptures found on Keros. (Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe, Germany) Photo by Smial CC BY-SA 2.5The research team believes that the Dhaskalio settlement flourished during the period known as the Cycladic Early Bronze Age, which spanned from roughly 3200 to 1050 BC. On the Greek pyramid island researchers found steep paths leading up to the summit and enormous platforms designed to be built upon. The buildings on the tiny island were made from good quality marble.Cycladic female figurine, from Museum of Cycladic Art at AthensThe settlement of Dhaskalio required thousands of tons of marble along with obsidian building tools. All of this had to be imported from an island more than six miles away, suggesting these inhabitants were skilled sailors.Related Video:“Archaeologists now believe that, in order to construct the complex, early Bronze Age Greeks embarked on at least 3,500 maritime voyages to transport between 7,000 and 10,000 tonnes of shining white marble from one Aegean island to another,” according to msn. “Each return voyage would have required up to 24 crew members to paddle for around five hours.”“It is by far the largest prehistoric marine transport operation that has ever come to light anywhere in the world,” said Dr Julian Whitewright, a leading maritime archaeologist at the University of Southampton.“It demonstrates quite clearly just how important, and integral to their culture, seafaring was to these early Bronze Age Aegean people.”Related Article: Drought in Iraq Reveals 3,400-yr-old Palace that Astounds ArchaeologistsThe Greek pyramid island had a settlement with metal-working shops, buildings and even indoor plumbing, and all of this a millennium before the Minoans, who are often thought of as the first European civilization. According to the Keep Talking Greece website, the team of archaeologists have uncovered “a complex, stratified and technically expert society.”Based on their finds, archaeologists now theorize the people of Dhaskalio may have played an important role in supplying weapons and other metal products to the surrounding islands.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING