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Ruud tells Moyes medals are a must

first_img “I think everyone expects a league title, FA Cup, Champions League trophy and playing some good football. In that sense the pressure is full on but I think he knows what he is getting into. I don’t know him personally but he looks like a guy who will handle that.” Moyes does not officially take charge until July 1 but has already been familiarising himself with the set-up at the club. Recruitment of his backroom staff has yet to be finalised but assistant manager Mike Phelan and goalkeeping coach Eric Steele have already been moved on. More are expected to follow – coach Rene Meulensteen is virtually certain to depart despite being offered a role in charge of the youth set-up – as remnants of the Ferguson era are gradually whittled away. However, former United defender Henning Berg does not believe Moyes will have any issues putting his own stamp on things and gaining the respect of the players. “I don’t think (exerting his authority) will be a problem,” said the Norwegian, who had a brief spell in charge at Blackburn last season. “The way he leads I am 100 per cent sure he will have the respect and authority any way. I am sure he is looking forward to the job. Everyone says it will be very difficult after Sir Alex Ferguson – and it will be – but it is a great opportunity to be honest.” The Scot has the unenviable task of succeeding Sir Alex Ferguson, whose 26-year reign at Old Trafford was laden with silverware. Moyes did not manage to win a trophy during 11 years at Everton – admittedly working with a fraction of the Red Devils’ budget – but Van Nistelrooy said that would not be acceptable at his new club. “Success at Manchester United? It doesn’t matter which manager it is you need to compete on all fronts so that will be expected of him and I don’t think that will be a surprise (to Moyes),” he said. Former Manchester United striker Ruud van Nistelrooy has warned new manager David Moyes everyone associated with the club expects to win major trophies – and in style.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Wisconsin heading to Sweet 16 with win over KSU

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) – Jordan Taylor couldn’t hit a thing, missing open shots and contested ones from just about everywhere on the court.He did so much more when it mattered, though, and Wisconsin is headed back to the round of 16 because of him.Taylor hit two big free throws and blocked Jacob Pullen’s 3-point attempt in the closing seconds to overcome a rough shooting night, lifting the Badgers to a 70-65 win over Kansas State on Saturday in the third round of the NCAA tournament.Taylor shot just 2 of 16 but came up with the biggest play of the game, swatting Pullen’s tying attempt in the final seconds with Wisconsin (25-8) up three. Josh Gasser then hit two free throws to seal it, sending the fourth-seeded Badgers into the round of 16 for the fourth time since 2000.Jon Leuer led Wisconsin with 19 points and Keaton Nankivil added 12. Taylor finished with 12 points, six assists, no turnovers and one big block.Wisconsin moves on to face upset specialist Butler, a winner over top-seeded Pittsburgh, in the Southeast regional semifinals Thursday in New Orleans.Pullen matched a career high with 38 points to break Mike Evans’ school career scoring mark (2,115 points), but walked away wiping tears with his jersey after a stellar four years in the Little Apple. Curtis Kelly (11 points) was the only other player to score in double figures for No. 5 seed Kansas State (23-11).Kansas State and Wisconsin met in the second round of the 2008 NCAA tournament, though only a handful of current players saw playing time in the Badgers’ 17-point win.The rematch, of sorts, was going to be all about which team could get the other to play at its pace.Wisconsin wanted the game slow, to squeeze its opponent defensively and milk its deliberate, ball-control offense until late in the shot clock, the goal to either set up one of its multitude of shooters or allow Taylor to get into the lane for a layup or dish.The Wildcats, with their slew of long, athletic players, wanted to turn the Badgers frenetic with pressure to set up easy baskets at the other end.Kansas State had some speed-’em-up success against Utah State in its opener, hounding the Aggies in the first 20 minutes before holding on for the win in a sloppy second half.Doing it against Wisconsin wasn’t going to be easy.The Badgers are on pace to set an NCAA record with 7.56 turnovers per game and are led by Taylor, whose 4.03 assist-to-turnover ratio was best in the nation. Wisconsin is also the best free throw shooting team in the country, close to another NCAA mark (Harvard, 82.2 percent in 1984) at 82.3 percent.The Badgers played their deliberation operation to perfection in their NCAA opener, grinding down Belmont with 12 3-pointers while putting a spoke in the wheel of the Bruins’ offense.After a get-a-feel-for-it start, Wisconsin was able to establish its tempo in the first half against Kansas State, working the ball – deliberately, of course – around to set up shots along the perimeter. The Badgers made most of ’em, too, hitting 5 of 10 3-pointers in the first half to lead 36-30.Pullen was a freshman when Wisconsin ran over the Wildcats in 2008 and seemed intent on getting payback four years in the making, firing up jumpers even with a hand in his face and dashing into the lane, scoring 17 points in the first half.Other than an early flurry by Kelly, Pullen didn’t get a lot of help, the rest of the team combining to miss its six shots in the first half.Pullen got the Wildcats back in it quickly in the second half.He opened by pulling up for a 3-pointer, then faked a pass behind his back to set up a layup and added another 3-pointer to cap a 9-0 run. K-State was back to its swarming ways at the defensive end to complement Pullen’s shooting, forcing Wisconsin to miss its first six shots of the half.The Badgers rallied, went through another string of missed shots and rallied again to set up the tense finish capped by Taylor’s game-saving swat.last_img read more

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Cracking the creative code

first_imgFor all the Delhi University applicants and parents dismayed at the ever-soaring cut-off lists, there has been some measure of hope. DU colleges reserve five per cent of their seats for sports and five per cent for extracurricular activities (ECA).Previously, the ECA exams and trials would be held at the colleges candidates had applied to, and the criteria would also be set by those colleges. But for the past three years, the ECA trials have been centralised. This means all ECA trials for a certain category are held at a single time and venue at the University.This year, the trials (both preliminary and final rounds) took place during the first half of July and more than 1,000 seats have filled up.Prof. Rajeev Gupta, head of admissions committee, and Dean of Students’ Welfare, explains, “Students had to fill an application form, and then they need to identify which ECA category they would like to apply to. It has two parts; 25 per cent weightage is given to the certificates, and 75 per cent is given for the performance at the trials. Candidates are shortlisted for the finals, and then colleges are approached. After that, the colleges can give the selected course a leeway of up to 15 per cent from the last cut-off list.”He adds, “After the finals, the admissions committee releases the merit list. The colleges can give up to 15 per cent discount, which also depends on the candidate’s selection of courses and college. It is a dynamic process, so it will vary from college to college, as every college will have a different set of numbers and criteria. If there are seats to be filled, or if the students have applied to more than one course, the college can adjust the criteria.”advertisementFor decades, categories such as the ECA and sports have always had a sizeable number of seats for those who may have scored the required (and staggering) marks needed for the course and college of their choice, but have other credentials.Manvi Shekhar, part of Jesus and Mary College’s English theatre society Troubadours, shares her experience, “I had 94 per cent, while the cut- off for B.Com (Hons) was at 96 per cent. Everything really did hang on the trials, and even after I cleared the finals, I had to wait for the fifth cut-off list, where the marks for B.Com was 95.75 per cent. I had just enough marks to make it.”The trials themselves are a thorough vetting process. Dr Geeta Sharma, associate professor at the Hindi department at Shyama Prasad Mukerjee (SPM) College, breaks down the process for the trials for Indian classical and folk music, which were hosted at SPM.”The trials (both prelims and final) were held here from July 4 to July 12. The prelims were for all 2,000 students who had enrolled. The entire process took a period of eight days. The panel of judges comprised internationally acclaimed dancers, and people from the music and dance departments in DU.”She explains the process was methodical and stringent, with first the verification of the certificates of previous performances and dance exams being carried out, and even with certain questions of the respective dance form directed to some of the students.Sharma adds, “There were also at least 10 boys at the trials. It’s a good thing for dance.”Odissi dancer Nikita Bajaj comments on the stringent nature of the trials. “It’s not like you could just show up and dance on stage in front of the audience. We had to have all our certificates of merit ready, and answer the judges’ questions on the dance forms, some of which were very difficult.”Bajaj is starting her first year in History (Hons) at Hansraj College and is now part of Kavyaakriti, the classical dance society.Many say the new centrailsed system is better. Sharma points out one advantage.”This was not a sudden shift in policy. This decision had been taken with some thought. The earlier system was problematic for the students. Sometimes four colleges would give the same time for one day, and there would be only one day for the ECA trials. What would become of the students then?.”Pratyuk Bakshi, now part of the English Debating Society at Ramjas College, where he is studying Economic (Hons) agrees on the convenience factor.”I’ve heard so many stories where, for example, a trial for one subject would be in Hindu at 10 am, and another trial would be at 12 pm in Venkateswara college. This time, as it happened, all debate trials were in Kirori Mal College.”advertisementThere is always an amount of flexibility in the trials. As Gupta says, “It can also depend on the popularity of the course itself. If the cutoffs are very high, a leeway of 5 per cent is given. But if there are not many takers for certain courses, colleges can increase the scope beyond 5 per cent.” This, as he says, is especially true of several of the languages courses.(The names of these students have been changed on request)last_img read more

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