Month: July 2019

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PRIVATE BLOG – Gold reached 141540

first_img Categories: Gold PRIVATE BLOG – Gold reached $1415.40 Private blog posts are exclusively available to Socrates subscribers. To sign-up for Socrates or to learn more, please visit Ask-Socrates.com.https://ask-socrates.com/ « Gold & War center_img Socrates & Gold »last_img

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IHI hosts representatives to develop a national action plan for patient safety

first_imgMay 22 2018Aiming to relaunch the nation’s patient safety agenda with renewed energy and focus, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) today hosts representatives from 24 organizations to begin work on a national strategy for reducing harm in the delivery of health care. The National Steering Committee for Patient Safety, with members from the health care, policy, regulatory, and advocacy communities, is charged with creating a National Action Plan to serve as a roadmap to accelerate progress.Co-chaired by Tejal K. Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, Chief Clinical and Safety Officer, IHI, and Jeffrey Brady, MD, MPH, Director, Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety at the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the committee meets for the first time today in Boston ahead of the 20th Annual IHI/NPSF Patient Safety Congress, which gets underway tomorrow at the Hynes Convention Center.This new effort stems from a 2017 Call to Action issued by the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF), which merged with IHI last year to combine the strengths of the two organizations around patient safety. The Call to Action frames medical harm as an issue that affects all of society, demanding a coordinated response by the health care and public health sectors.”For decades, experts have called for increased coordination to improve patient safety, but such a strategy has not been fully instituted,” Gandhi said. “There is still so much work to be done in patient safety, in part because we’ve reached the limits of what a project-by-project approach can achieve. Instead of declaring ‘mission accomplished,’ we need to take steps to advance total systems safety — safety that is reliably and uniformly applied wherever care is provided.”As outlined in a 2015 NPSF report, a total systems approach contains elements that have proven to be at the foundation of safety and are key to making sustainable progress in all health settings. They include safety culture, leadership, communication among team members, measurement, and patient and family engagement.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyDanbury Hospital launches ‘Healing Hugs’ for its most vulnerable patientsThe public was first exposed to the term “patient safety” nearly 20 years ago with the release of To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, a report estimating that as many as 98,000 deaths in the US each year are the result of harm accidentally inflicted during a medical encounter. Recent studies claim that four times as many deaths can be attributed to medical harm, making it by some estimates the third leading cause of death in the US and a source of long-term physical, emotional, and psychological damage.”We’ve seen success in targeted areas, such as reductions in health care-associated infections and hospital-acquired conditions,” said Brady. “Those gains have been supported by prominent national initiatives and efforts involving governmental agencies and public-private partnerships. This renewed, shared focus on keeping patients safe and the work of the National Steering Committee reflect the importance of effective coordination at all levels — from national organizations to individual clinicians. Teamwork will be necessary to achieve patient safety across the entire continuum of patient care.”The care continuum includes office practices, ambulatory centers, and clinics where most care is now delivered in the US. Studies about the extent of harm and effective strategies to address problems in these settings, such as errors in diagnosis and lost test results, are only now starting to get attention.For example, a growing number of people receive care in outpatient settings and in their own homes with very little guidance or knowledge about patient safety. Care in the home is the subject of a forthcoming report from IHI outlining the potential risk of harm to patients along with recommendations for improving safety in this setting. Patient safety in ambulatory care is also one of the focus areas of this year’s Patient Safety Congress, with a session addressing safety in home care and others focused on a variety of outpatient settings. Source:http://www.ihi.org/last_img read more

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HSS takes young patients with physical challenges on a surfing trip

first_img Source:https://www.hss.edu Aug 17 2018Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) made a splash this week with a surfing trip for young patients. Giving new meaning to the term “patient care,” the Adaptive Sports Academy at Lerner Children’s Pavilion at HSS treated 12 patients, along with some of their siblings, to sand and surf in Long Beach, Long Island.The Academy enables young people with cerebral palsy or another physical challenge to experience the benefits of exercise. The program’s trips and recreational experiences aim to build their self-confidence, encourage independence, and increase physical activity and mobility. The excursions are offered without cost, thanks to the generosity of donors.Related StoriesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryHave cancer, must travel: Patients left in lurch after hospital closesAdaptive surfing and other activities are competitive or recreational sports for people with disabilities. Sometimes rules or equipment is modified to meet the needs of participants. Some are understandably nervous at first, but they almost always exceed their own expectations and have a blast.Ranging in age from 6 to 22, many patients who signed up for surfing have cerebral palsy or another condition that affects body movement, muscle control, posture and balance. A number of the young people have had multiple surgeries by pediatric orthopedic surgeons at HSS and go there for physical therapy.Some used a beach wheelchair to get to the water, but that didn’t stop them from climbing on the surfboard. Balancing on a surfboard while in the water would be a challenge for any beginner, but with help from their instructors, many patients experienced the thrill of a lifetime standing on the surfboard while riding a wave.Six year-old Brooklyn McDonald was excited just talking about it. “It went great, I loved it,” she exclaimed. “I caught a lot of waves,” she added, already using surfer lingo. Her mom was thrilled to see what her daughter could accomplish. “It was awesome,” said Andrea McDonald, who has taken Brooklyn on a number of adaptive sports trips sponsored by HSS. “We try to bring her to these events because it’s almost the only opportunity she has to participate in something that’s inclusive,” she explained.”These children are fearless, they did so well surfing,” said Bridget Assip, a pediatric physical therapist on the trip. “It benefits them because they feel free in the water. They can do things that they may have a harder time doing on land. The families and kids had a great day at the beach and so much fun in the water.”The Adaptive Sports Academy offers a number of fun activities that benefit patients throughout the year, including horseback riding, rock climbing, tennis and basketball. Dancing with the Rockettes is on the agenda for later this year.last_img read more

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Global study shows that certain brain disorders are genetically related

first_img Source:https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-august-2018/many-brain-disorders-are-genetically-linked/ Aug 22 2018A global study conducted by the international “Brainstorm Consortium” has, for the first time, analyzed the genome of 1.1 million patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders and has shown that certain brain disorders are genetically related. For example, there is a significant correlation between psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. The Austrian child and adolescent psychiatrist Andreas Karwautz from MedUni Vienna’s Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry was involved in the study, which was recently published in the leading journal “Science”.Hitherto, psychiatric disorders such as anorexia, depression and schizophrenia, for example, have predominantly been diagnosed phenotypically, based on the presenting symptoms. However, in most cases this gave rise to a certain lack of clarity, since many classification models fail to provide an adequate description of the particular disorders. Andreas Karwautz, child and adolescent psychiatrist at MedUni Vienna’s Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and co-author of the study says: “There is no such thing as ‘simple’ depression or ‘simple’ anorexia that does not exhibit symptoms of other mental disorders. A diagnosis is always heterogeneous.”The large-scale, international study conducted by the Brainstorm Consortium, which comprises several working groups from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has now analyzed genomic data from around 265,000 psychiatric and neurological patients, as well as 785,000 healthy people. The study investigated whether there is a correlation between disorders with certain genetic features. For the purposes of the recent study, the common hereditary factors of fifteen neurological diseases and ten psychiatric diseases were analyzed. MedUni Vienna provided data from patients from the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, who were suffering from eating disorders.Related StoriesDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskThe study authors looked at three key aspects: psychiatric and neurological disorders were each considered as an individual group and then in comparison to each other. The main findings are as follows: some psychiatric disorders have significant genetic commonalities, which increase the risk of patients who develop one disorder also developing the correlated disorder. This is the case for schizophrenia, depressive episodes, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder and ADHD but not for Tourette’s or autism, which hardly exhibit any genetic correlations. On the other hand, depression and anxiety disorder are closely related genetically, even if their symptoms are very different. The same applies to anorexia and obsessive-compulsive disorder, as well as to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.The findings on the second aspect indicate that, according to the study, there is generally a greater genetic difference between neurological diseases within their own group. The third main aspect of the analysis showed that they also differ genetically from the various psychiatric disorders, with the exception of migraine. This was found to have correlations with ADHD, Tourette syndrome and depressive episodes. The study therefore showed that there are overlaps when it comes to specific genetic predispositions, thereby casting doubt upon traditional diagnostic classifications. From the material, it is also possible to see that genetically correlated diseases, such as psychoses, for example, have similar symptoms, which occur in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease.Karwautz explains: “This genome analysis, which for the first time involved statistically significant case numbers, forms a good basis for improving the psychiatric classification models with the aid of well-founded neurobiological diagnostics. As a researcher, I am delighted that my work at MedUni Vienna has enabled me to contribute to this global endeavor.last_img read more

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Air bubbles sink and steel spheres rise in an unusual fluid

first_imgPORTLAND, OREGON—In a liquid, bubbles are supposed to rise and steel is supposed to sink. But engineers have reported exactly the opposite in a water-based mixture that contains a gelling agent known as carbopol, commonly used as a thickener in cosmetics. These “complex fluids” behave like a solid when at rest but can flow like a liquid when they’re pushed on. (Whipped cream and mashed potatoes are a couple of examples.) The team filled a container with roughly half a liter of the transparent fluid and inserted a steel sphere a few millimeters in diameter. They then banged the container upward on the underside of a table, producing a downward force. For the nearly massless air bubbles, this downward force was stronger than the upward-pointing buoyant force, causing the bubbles to sink, the team reported here at the 69th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics last week. But the steel sphere, with its significantly larger inertia, tended to keep going in the direction of the initial upward movement and therefore rose (as seen in video). The finding may pave the way for stronger building materials by helping remove large air voids from wet concrete, the authors say.last_img read more

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Podcast Rice domestication baby brain scans and skin pigment genes

first_imgDanny Chapman/Flickr This week we hear stories about a new brain imaging technique for newborns, recently uncovered evidence on rice domestication on three continents, and why Canada geese might be migrating into cities, with Online News Editor David Grimm.  Sarah Crespi interviews Sarah Tishkoff of the University of Pennsylvania about the age and diversity of genes related to skin pigment in African genomes.  Listen to previous podcasts.  [Image: Danny Chapman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img

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Openaccess journal editors resign after alleged pressure to publish mediocre papers

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Open-access journal editors resign after alleged pressure to publish mediocre papers Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe All 10 senior editors of the open-access journal Nutrients resigned last month, alleging that the publisher, the Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), pressured them to accept manuscripts of mediocre quality and importance.The conflict is familiar for many commercial open-access publishers: Because authors pay fees per published article (about $1800 in the case of Nutrients), the publisher has an incentive to publish as many as possible. On the other hand, scientists prefer to publish in choosy, reputable journals, and academic journal editors want to maintain this quality.On 15 August, the editor-in-chief of the journal, Jon Buckley, of the University of South Australia in Adelaide, received an email from MDPI announcing his replacement at the end of the year by someone who would “bring different ideas on board.” Buckley says this was an excuse to push him aside because of his strict editorial policy. He resigned immediately, and nine other senior editors followed. By Jop de VriezeSep. 4, 2018 , 3:45 PMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Founded in 1996, Basel, Switzerland–based MDPI, has 213 open-access journals, of which 37 now have an impact factor. In 2014, it was briefly included on a list of predatory publishers maintained by Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado in Boulder, but it was removed after the company appealed the decision. Today, MDPI is included in the Directory of Open Access Journals.Buckley had been working to boost the visibility and reputation of Nutrients, a human clinical nutrition journal founded in 2009. Its impact factor (a measure of how often the journal’s articles are cited) increased from less than one in 2011 to 4.2 in 2017, making it one of MDPI’s most prominent journals.The number of published papers has also been rising. Between 2009 and 2017, just over 5000 papers have been published—1300 of them in 2017 alone. But according to Buckley, there has also been a sharp rise in the number of low-quality submitted manuscripts. To weed these papers out, Buckley says the journal’s rejection rate would end up having to rise from about 55% to something between 60% and 70%.MDPI CEO Franck Vazquez objects to this decision. “We are against setting an artificial rejection rate,” he says. “Every article must be evaluated on quality, and if more papers are good enough, more should be published.” Vazquez wants MDPI to be a world leader in the dissemination of science, whereas he says Buckley was focused too much on impact factors. “When an article is sound and useful for researchers, it should be published, even when it is not very novel.”Lynda Williams of the University of Aberdeen in the United Kingdom, one of the senior editors who stepped down, says editors began to sense pressure to accept more articles in recent months. This spring, a guest editor received comments from MDPI staff for having rejected too many papers, and occasionally the editors were asked to reconsider rejections. Williams feels this strategy will eventually harm the journal’s impact factor and lead to a drop in submissions—threatening the journal itself. “They are essentially killing the cash cow,” Williams says. Vazquez disagrees with this analysis and points out that most of the company’s journals have boosted their impact factors even as they have published more papers. “If I would be killing the cash cow, I would be stupid.”It is unclear whether editors of other MDPI journals are involved in similar discussions. In a response to an inquiry from Science, the recently appointed editor-in-chief of Marine Drugs, Orazio Taglialatela-Scafati of the University of Naples Federico II in Italy, writes that MDPI has “confirmed my absolute freedom to decide, basing only on the quality of papers. I hope that in the next months they will keep this approach.”The conflict is salient because this week 11 European national funding organizations announced that beginning in 2020, research they fund should only be published in open-access journals, which make articles publicly available, as opposed to traditional journals, which sometimes block access to nonsubscribers. To maintain a level of quality, scientists will be directed to publish only in journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals.In the meantime, MDPI has appointed two new editors-in-chief at Nutrients, who Vazquez says will “maintain the high quality of the journal.” As for Buckley, he thinks he has been “kind of naive,” assuming he would be able to lead a high-quality open-access journal owned by a commercial publisher. He believes that academic societies are better suited to setting up and managing open-access journals. “They will not be interested in the number of papers and don’t have other interests than the journal editors.”*Correction, 7 September, 11:15 a.m.: An earlier version of the story misstated the number of MDPI journals with an impact factor.last_img read more

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US universities reassess collaborations with foreign scientists in wake of NIH letters

first_imgThe main campus of the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email By Jeffrey MervisApr. 26, 2019 , 11:40 AM U.S. universities reassess collaborations with foreign scientists in wake of NIH letters Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Adam Kuspa tries to anticipate queries from his institution’s largest source of research funding, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. “We like to tell NIH things before they ask us,” says Kuspa, senior vice president and dean of research at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in Houston, Texas.In August 2018, NIH Director Francis Collins asked BCM and thousands of other institutions to be more vigilant in defending the U.S. research enterprise against efforts by unscrupulous foreign governments to steal ideas and technology. Kuspa had just attended a classified Federal Bureau of Investigation briefing on the topic for Houston-area academic leaders and figured the issue was heating up. So he ordered up an audit of the foreign affiliations of every BCM faculty member with current NIH funding. The review, which won’t be finished until the end of the year, has meant poking into the professional lives of roughly 500 of the college’s 3500 scientists. But Kuspa’s attempt to stay ahead of NIH came to naught. A few months into the audit, BCM received letters from NIH asking about four scientists it believed had violated the agency’s rule requiring them to disclose all foreign ties relating to their research. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Baylor College of Medicine BCM wasn’t being singled out. Earlier this month, Collins told Congress that similar NIH letters had spawned investigations at more than 55 institutions. And BCM’s next-door neighbor, the MD Anderson Cancer Center, moved to fire three faculty members this month after NIH notified it of potentially “serious violations” by five faculty members, including sharing confidential grant applications and failing to report foreign funding and business ties. (MD Anderson had already suspended at least one of the scientists named by NIH after an investigation still underway.)BCM investigated the three faculty members named by NIH in the 29 November letters. “Each of the three had appointments at Chinese universities that Baylor knew about, but they were not always reported properly,” Kuspa explains, noting the three were born in China and are now naturalized U.S. citizens. “Two of the three held grants from the Chinese government that were not disclosed properly and did not undergo the required review by Baylor for research conflict of interest.”After completing the review, Kuspa says, Baylor decided none should be disciplined. Instead, he says, Baylor notified NIH that it has corrected the record by making sure all of their foreign affiliations are listed in the biosketch that accompanies every federal grant application, as well as the annual progress reports that grantees file with funding agencies, and in any publication stemming from the NIH-funded research. It has also tweaked its internal procedures to flag any grant proposal with a foreign component. The aim is to make sure the proposal has been thoroughly vetted—NIH requires researchers to explain why they need to work with a foreign partner—before being submitted.It’s impossible to know where MD Anderson and BCM fit along a continuum of institutional responses to the NIH letters. No other institution that ScienceInsider has contacted has been willing to discuss its response to the NIH letters flagging individual faculty members; most won’t even confirm they received any letters.This email response from the research chief at one major research university is illustrative: “We are in the middle of the investigation … and currently weighing the various options. We take foreign influence seriously but want our response to be measured and well thought out.”Working in the darkThe relatively mild nature of the violations at BCM may have made Kuspa more willing to talk about them publicly. “We have not seen any evidence of malice aforethought or attempts to acquire intellectual property or act inappropriately,” he says about the four researchers. “And we weren’t asked to investigate any of that.”At the same time, Kuspa says, BCM hasn’t simply gone back to business as usual. The NIH letters, he says, have revealed how hard it is for an institution to monitor the foreign ties of its researchers and the extent of its ignorance.“We wanted to do this audit in a way that would not harm international collaborations, which everyone agrees are a good thing in biomedical research,” Kuspa says. “And the first step is to describe what collaborations exist.”To do that, BCM administrators have relied on faculty members and their department chairs. “To be honest,” he says, “we have no way of knowing about some of these affiliations unless they tell us.” That dependency has prompted the medical school to consider several steps that would alter how its faculty members interact with colleagues around the world.One major change under consideration would eliminate dual appointments, that is, allowing faculty to operate a second lab at another institution. Such arrangements, which are not unusual, reflect the global nature of science, Kuspa acknowledges. They allow institutions to tap into expertise not available on the home campus, strengthen international ties, and, when located in a developing country, help build global capacity.Stretched too thin?But such dual connections have become a lightning rod for those who warn that foreign countries are trying to steal U.S. technologies developed in part by federally funded grants to university scientists. One highly visible target has been China’s Thousand Talents program, a decadelong effort to build ties with ethnic Chinese researchers working outside of China by offering them research support, salaries, and other perks. One common Thousand Talents arrangement involves the faculty member spending a few months a year in China while retaining their position in the United States.“We’ve done that in the past,” says Kuspa, recalling a handful of such arrangements he approved as chairman of the medical school’s biochemistry department. But the political winds have shifted, he says, and he thinks the practice is no longer viable.“Independent of NIH’s growing concern [about foreign affiliations],” says Kuspa, “it’s become increasing obvious that it’s extremely difficult, if not impossible, to oversee research by faculty members being carried out at another institution, especially one that is overseas. So going forward, we’re doing to discourage those sorts of interactions. And for legacy agreements, we’re thinking hard [about] whether to renew them, and we probably won’t.”Kuspa scoffs at the notion that the new policy would hinder a faculty member’s productivity, or the quality of the science being conducted. “No, I’m not worried, because they can still collaborate,” he says. “That second lab is generally based on having a good relationship with an individual in another department or at another institution. So why not just collaborate?”“And I’m not talking about just the Thousand Talents program or even a laboratory in China,” he says. “Imagine if I had to investigate one of my faculty members for an allegation of scientific misconduct? I would have no standing, as Baylor’s official representative, in [a different] country.”BCM does not currently have a policy barring dual appointments, Kuspa emphasizes. “If somebody wanted to make an argument for a second appointment, we’d look into it,” he says. “But I think the bar has been raised.”In defense of partnershipsLars Steinmetz cites his own scientific career to make the case for the benefits of dual appointments. The biophysicist now holds dual, tenured appointments at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, meaning he is simultaneously running two sizable laboratories on two continents. He spends 3 weeks at each lab, and every Monday—at 8 a.m. Pacific time and 5 p.m. German time—he leads a 2-hour group videoconference from wherever he happens to be.Despite that peripatetic travel schedule, he wouldn’t have it any other way.“I’ve asked myself that question for 15 years, because it requires a big commitment in terms of time and travel,” he says. “I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t think that there are a lot of advantages, scientifically. It enables us to do things we otherwise wouldn’t be able to do [with a single lab]. So I wouldn’t want to give it up.”In fact, Steinmetz has decided to double down on the arrangement. He’s lined up funding from a private foundation to launch a combined postdoctoral program this summer at the two institutions as part of the Life Science Alliance he directs. More than three dozen Stanford and EMBL faculty members have already agreed to provide lab space for what he calls “high-risk, high-reward” projects pitched by the newly minted Ph.D.s. “I think that’s a pretty good sign that they see the benefits of working with scientists at another institution,” he says.Science truly has no borders for Steinmetz, who joined EMBL in 2003 and was hired by Stanford in 2013, where he had retained a small lab after earning his Ph.D. in 2001. This month, he published a paper in collaboration with a team of Chinese scientists, one of whom has been a scientific partner for more than a decade. “They had already done the experiments and they wanted help in interpreting the data,” he says about the work, which documented that using the gene-editing tool CRISPR in mouse embryos yielded a surprisingly high number of off-target mutations.His principal collaborator, Wu Wei, has a similarly international pedigree. Wei had contacted Steinmetz as a graduate student in China and did a postdoc with Steinmetz at EMBL before working in Steinmetz’s lab as a staff scientist at Stanford. Now, he’s a professor at the Partner Institute for Computational Biology in Shanghai, China, a joint effort between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Max Planck Institute. Wei moved there last year with the help of a grant from the Thousand Talents program.The collaborative work was carried out and published within 9 months, Steinmetz says, “an example of how well things can go if you take advantage of who’s out there. Of course, everyone has a network. But the larger the network, the easier it is to find the right partner.”Massachusetts Institute of Technology takes a closer lookAt a time when every foreign research collaboration attracts added scrutiny, however, it can be difficult to find the right partner. The environment has become so fraught that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge recently announced a new three-step process for evaluating the “elevated risk” of any projects involving China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia. Unlike in the case of BCM and MD Anderson, its actions appear to be motivated by a desire to cushion itself from outside criticism rather than to forestall some type of government intervention.In a 3 April letter to the MIT community, Associate Provost Richard Lester and Vice President for Research Maria Zuber describe the new approach as a way “to engage the world effectively, with responsible management of risks and in keeping with the values of our community.” The letter also contained the news that MIT will strike no new research deals with two Chinese high-tech companies, Huawei and ZTE.(The U.S. government has accused Huawei of stealing intellectual property and lying about its compliance with U.S. trade and financial sanctions against Iran. Last summer, the government lifted its ban on U.S. companies selling to ZTE after the company pleaded guilty to violating the trade sanctions. In February, MIT President Rafael Reif condemned the Saudi government’s reaction to the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi but said it would continue to accept funding from Saudi entities.)Under the new MIT policy, any proposed collaboration with the three named countries would be vetted by a team of university managers familiar with federal laws and regulations governing interactions with foreign parties. If questions remain, the project would be passed along to Lester. He would then decide whether it should be reviewed by a faculty-led standing committee on international engagement or a “senior risk group” consisting of himself, Zuber, and the MIT general counsel.Zuber declined to discuss the rationale for the new procedures and said it was too early to measure its impact. But she told The Tech, MIT’s campus-based newspaper, that the new procedures are meant “to let our researchers feel comfortable and provide them with some cover in case anything goes wrong.”MIT has said it has not received any letters from NIH asking about individual faculty members, and Zuber told The Tech that “no one in the government said that they were threatening our funding.” She called the new procedures a way of “taking care of our institution and our researchers.”Part of the jobKuspa isn’t surprised that NIH found instances in which foreign ties were not reported to the agency. “It’s easy to find inconsistencies,” he says. “Anybody can do it. … If you have access to what we submit to NIH, all you have to do is look at the resulting publications by that PI [principal investigator] or from that grant,” and then flag any affiliations cited in the publications that were not reported to NIH.Kuspa hopes the ongoing audit will help BCM switch from playing defense to offense, a position he much prefers. “I have no idea how they selected those four [researchers]. But I can tell you we would have come up with those four as part of our audit.”Given the increased scrutiny, Kuspa thinks BCM may get additional letters in the months to come. But he’s not worried.“We have all sorts of accreditation bodies and oversight bodies, and they are always asking questions,” he says. “And we respond. In research administration, this is what we do every day.”last_img read more

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Update NASA declares end of Opportunitys mission

first_imgIn June 2018, a planet-encircling dust storm blotted out the sun over Opportunity for several months, weaning it off solar power and draining its batteries. Since then, JPL has sent the golf cart–size rover 600 commands to revive it. Engineers hoped seasonal winds, running high between November 2018 and the end of January, would clear the solar panels of dust, allowing for its recovery. But that hasn’t happened.“The end of the windy season could spell the end of the rover,” says Steven Squyres, the mission’s principal investigator at Cornell University. “But if this is the end, I can’t imagine a better way for it to happen … 15 years into a 90-day mission and taken out by one of the worst martian dust storms in many years.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Mars Exploration Rover Mission/Cornell/JPL/NASA Update: NASA declares end of Opportunity’s mission NASA’s Opportunity rover, seen here in a composite image, landed on Mars 15 years ago. Its end is nigh. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email *Update, 13 February, 2:10 p.m.: After more than a thousand attempts to revive the Opportunity rover, including a final unanswered command last night, NASA formally declared the end of the rover’s mission today. Read our story from 25 January here: There’s little hope left for rousing NASA’s Opportunity rover, which landed on Mars 15 years ago this month. For the past 6 months, the rover has sat silently and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, is running out of tricks to revive it. In the next few weeks, officials at the agency’s headquarters will decide whether to continue the search, the mission’s scientists say. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe John Callas, the misson project manager at JPL, says, “We’ve got another week. We’re running out of time.”The martian winter, which in 2011 ended the mission of Opportunity’s twin rover, Spirit, is months away. Sunlight is waning in the southern hemisphere and temperatures are dropping. Efforts to revive the rover have now lasted as long as the past campaign to revive Spirit. JPL is trying a few more long shots, such as commands that would tell Opportunity to switch to back antennas, if it had barely revived and was trying to use a broken antenna. “After that, I don’t know what to do next, if anything,” Callas says. Before the 5-week U.S. government shutdown, the plan was to have NASA headquarters weigh in on whether to continue the efforts after the windy season, he adds. With a plan now in place to reopen the government, such a decision could come soon from NASA science chief Thomas Zurbuchen.Whenever its mission ends, Opportunity will leave a trail of superlatives. Although it was only guaranteed to last 90 days on Mars, it ended up enduring at least 5000. It traversed a path 45 kilometers long, often driving backward because of an overheating steering control. It explored ever-larger impact craters as it went, with their deposits revealing more and more of the martian interior. Even after all that time, its 1-megapixel cameras were still working beautifully, says Jim Bell, a planetary scientist at Arizona State University in Tempe who leads the rover’s color camera team. Bell, for one, isn’t giving up hope. The rover is perched on the rim of Endeavor crater, he notes, and a wind gust could still come and revive Opportunity. “No one has ever won a bet against it. I’m not about to start.”From its landing in Meridiani Planum in 2004, Opportunity quickly revealed the sulfate-rich sandstones it drove on. The stones likely formed as shallow muds in lagoonlike environments, says Raymond Arvidson, a planetary scientist at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and the rover’s deputy principal investigator. “There was an ephemeral lake system, going dry, going wet. That’s a huge discovery.” The rover was intended to explore where Mars could have been habitable in the deep past, Bell adds, and Opportunity was the first to provide possible evidence for it.Subsequent craters explored by the rover revealed that periods of habitability extended far longer in the martian past than once thought. It spotted veins of the mineral gypsum near crater rims, which form thanks to evaporating water. And, in 2013, it provided the first surface observations of 4-billion-year-old clays, from a time on Mars older than the rocks probed by the Curiosity rover, when water could have truly been abundant. The finding, 9 years into its mission, validated observations from orbit, expanding the hunt for such clays, says Alberto Fairén, a planetary scientist at Cornell. “A beautiful example of how collaborative science should be done.”Few expected when they signed up for the Spirit and Opportunity rovers that they’d still be working on one 15 years later. In the end, though, Bell adds, “Mars always wins.” By Paul VoosenFeb. 13, 2019 , 2:10 PMlast_img read more

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Humanizing The Central Park 5

first_imgRaymond Santana, Kevin Richardson, Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam and Korey Wise have been given many names besides their own since they were arrested and wrongfully convicted of crimes related to the sexual assault of a white woman, Trisha Meili, in Central Park one night in April of 1989.Former New York Mayor Ed Koch called the boys, aged 14 to 16 at the time, monsters. Donald Trump called them murderers and infamously took out full-page ads in several New York newspapers, including the New York Times, uncoincidentally demanding that the death penalty be immediately reinstated. Mainstream media outlets called them a wolf pack. And the state of New York, years later, would call them innocent. They’ve since become widely known as the Central Park Five. Too often dead or incarcerated black and brown boys and girls become faceless fulcrums for national debates over race. Michael Brown becomes no angel. Trayvon Martin becomes a hoodie. Sandra Bland becomes a mugshot. The Central Park Five becomes a racist ad for the sake of Donald Trump’s self-aggrandizement.“When They See Us,” prayerfully does more than advocate for Santana, Richardson, McCray, Salaam and Wise through art. Duvernay leaves us wanting to go back in time and save the five from the NYPD interrogation rooms. She takes us with them inside walls and bars in which they never belonged. In revealing, she committed the radical and all too uncommon act of loving them — arguably the best form of public justice they’ve received.David Dennis, Jr. is a writer and adjunct professor of Journalism at Morehouse College. David’s writing has appeared in The Guardian, The Smoking Section, Uproxx, Playboy, The Atlantic, Complex.com and wherever people argue about things on the internet.SEE ALSO:No, We Don’t Live In A Racial UtopiaConcealed Evidence Reminds How Cops Are Killing Blacks When teenage Antron gently puts his hand on his lawyer’s shoulder and says “you tried your best,” we see a boy’s lost innocence, his coming to terms with being locked away for nearly as long as he’s been alive. When Yusef’s mother screams in agony at her son’s guilty verdict — through no fault of his own having the promise of his future shattered.Underneath and behind the news debates over — and street marches for — the Central Park Five’s freedom, were these everyday families trying to find a ballast amid the constant whiplash of police, legalese, intruding cameras and racism that was deeply personal from strangers they couldn’t even know. And yet, in “When They See Us” the familial bonds and love never wilts.When Raymond gently lays his head on his grandmother’s lap after he’s released from the interrogation, we’re reminded he is just a boy. When Kevin’s family visits him in his detention center and they laugh at his sister’s failed dating life, we see smiles despite a space that detests joy. While the first half of the series, as you’d expect, revolves around the boys’ arrests and the trial itself, the final two episodes revolve around the men’s halting attempts to rejoin civilian life after the trauma of incarceration. For some of the Five, as with millions of others, this less visible, second-order phase of the incarceral state was just as devastating, in some ways, as the pain of living in a cage.When we see Raymond having to register as a sex offender for a crime he didn’t commit after he gets out of jail, your diaphragm tightens, feeling his mix of mortification and frustration as your own. Duvernay so thoroughly transforms the men from objects into protagonists that when Raymond’s failed attempts at re-entering the workforce with a felony record leads him back to jail, a large part of you finds it hard to blame him.We see desperation washing over Yusef’s face and his eyes widen as he realizes his dream of being an educator is going to be deferred — his felony status renders him unable to obtain a teaching certification. And we see the tragic story of Korey Wise, the young man who was tried as an adult because he was 16 when he was arrested. His story, which takes up an entire episode, is one of simply trying to survive as inmates and guards try to make an example out of a man they believed committed one of the most infamous crimes of the century. 2016 Democratic National Convention Sudan Is Burning But People Don’t Care Because It’s Not A Cathedral Honoring Mothers Of The Movement For Black Lives By the end of the series, your body almost feels exhausted from the ride, but your mind is made up, more clearly on the side of the Central Park Five than any deep dive magazine feature could’ve brought you. Yes, in the end, the men were exonerated and reached million-dollar settlements. But the cleverly titled “When They See Us” made sure that viewers witness the ways the injustices they faced still nearly destroyed their lives, and robbed them of much of it.The underlying fear, of course, for any black viewer is that what we are witnessing can happen to any of us. I am a black man who grew up in the 90s. I saw my younger self in the boys. I saw my son in the boys. I saw myself in the parents. I have hope even those who aren’t black see this too. That they recognize that there but for the color of their skin, that “there but for the grace of God, go I,” snatched away by boogeymen in badges on a random night in the park with friends.In that way, there’s a beauty in the visceral terror, a universality. Through it, “When They See Us” has already gracefully inserted itself into the canon of films that show the vivid lives behind the statistics and stereotypes of people of color. It’s a film the recently passed John Singleton writer and director of 1991’s “Boyz In The Hood” would have loved to see. Dear White People: Make Your White Friends Watch ‘When They See Us’ More By daviddtss Stop Telling Black Folks To Settle For A Candidate Just To Beat Trump In 2020 ava duvernay , Central Park 5 , When They See Us But even as their case became a symbol of the tough on crime era’s excesses, their sentences evidence of the failure of mass incarceration and the substance of the trial a case study in criminology courses on the revolution of DNA testing, the five boys who became men who had their lives nearly ruined by a racist system have rarely been addressed as what they first and foremost were and are: human beings.That’s why Ava Duvernay’s painful, haunting and necessary new miniseries “When They See Us” is, taken together in full, a work of love: she gives these five men the humanity they’ve been denied since the moment police first put them in handcuffs 30 years ago.Rather than the Five being proxies for a review of America’s race relations at the time, Duvernay grounds us in the granular intimacy of their horror stories.In the first episode, as the NYPD conducts their 40-plus hour interrogation of the teenage boys, bending the reality of what happened to their will, the camera is fixed on the young actors’ faces as their voices crack and they weep while trying to plead their innocence. When Kevin Richardson, eye swollen from being struck by a police officer days earlier, screams and begs his sister to sign his coerced confession just so he can get out of the interrogation — “I don’t wanna stay here anymore!” — the dramatic irony of knowing she’s effectively signed him into prison is a slow twist of a knife.last_img read more

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First opioid settlement to fund ambitious addiction research center

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Jeffrey MervisApr. 2, 2019 , 1:20 PM A fledgling, small-scale approach to dealing with the state’s opioid crisis paid off big last week for Oklahoma State University (OSU) when it became the surprise beneficiary of a $270 million legal settlement with Purdue Pharma. It’s the first agreement in some 1700 pending cases around the United States against Purdue, which makes the painkiller OxyContin, and other manufacturers of prescription opioids.On 26 March, the state of Oklahoma agreed to drop its suit alleging deceptive marketing practices by Purdue in exchange for a National Center for Addiction Studies and Treatment at OSU’s medical complex in Tulsa. Purdue and the Sackler family, which owns the Stamford, Connecticut–based company, will provide a $177 million endowment for the national center, along with $20 million over 5 years for naloxone and other drugs to treat opioid addiction. The state is continuing its suit against several other companies, with opening arguments set for 28 May.The windfall for the new entity, which aspires “to become the premier addiction research center in the nation,” rewards OSU’s ambition. In October 2017, it opened a modest Center for Wellness and Recovery within its medical school to train future addiction medicine physicians, study the underlying causes of addiction and pain, provide treatment to those suffering from opioid use disorder, and educate the public about the burgeoning epidemic, which claims 130 lives a day in the United States and in 2017 killed nearly 800 Oklahomans. The center now has a staff of eight and a $2.4 million budget. Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter (left) joins Oklahoma State University medical school President Kayse Shrum (right) to announce the settlement.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Jason Beaman, who heads the psychiatry department at the medical school and directs training efforts for the wellness center, acknowledges that OSU has a lot of ground to make up to become a preeminent medical research organization. “The [psychiatry] department has zero history of NIH [National Institutes of Health] grants,” he says. “But we’ve got four in review right now.” In addition, the center’s first two addiction medicine fellows start this summer, and he hopes to have six in the next cohort.Beaman says he left the University of Arkansas in 2015 and returned to his alma mater because the medical school had made addressing the state’s mounting opioid crisis a priority. “Our mission is to train primary care physicians to work in rural and underserved areas,” says OSU’s Kayse Shrum, who became the youngest and first female president of an Oklahoma medical school when she was promoted into the job in 2013. “And that’s where the [addiction] crisis is most acute. So we began hiring psychiatrists with expertise in addiction medicine.”Shrum and Beaman also benefited from serendipity. The medical school at their archrival, the University of Oklahoma (OU) in Norman, is known nationally for its efforts to combat cancer and cardiovascular disease, and last year its faculty members could boast of 105 NIH grants. (OSU has one, a capacity-building grant to study adverse childhood experiences.) But in 2016, OU officials decided addiction medicine was no longer a priority and ended the training program.“We lost our funding, and I retired after 25 years there,” says emeritus professor William Yarborough, who ran the program. “Meanwhile, OSU was ramping up its program. So once [the state and Purdue] reached a deal, there really wasn’t anybody else at the table,” says Yarborough, who is president of the Oklahoma Society of Addiction Medicine.Beaman’s department has swelled from three to 20 faculty members in the past 3 years, and he expects the settlement and the endowment to accelerate that growth. “There are three or four people who I anticipate being able to hire almost immediately,” he says. “And I’ll also go on the road. Maybe I’m being a Pollyanna, but who wouldn’t want to be part of what I hope will be the first sign of the end of the country’s opioid epidemic?”The settlement creates an endowment that is likely to generate less than $10 million a year in new spending. That new pot is dwarfed by the $500 million that NIH will spend this year on its new Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative, launched in April 2018. And even that amount, public health advocates say, is minuscule compared with the magnitude of the opioid epidemic and the pressing need for treatment facilities, medical providers, and prevention.Cheryl Healton, dean of public health at New York University in New York City, praises Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter for negotiating a deal that funnels most of the money to those needs. “That’s a far cry from the tobacco settlement,” she says, referring to the $126 billion tobacco companies have paid out to date to 46 states under a 1998 agreement.For many years Healton led a national public antismoking campaign financed by the massive settlement. State officials were given the power to allocate the money as they saw fit, however, and less than 1% of it has gone to tobacco prevention programs, even as tobacco companies continue to spend billions each year on marketing their products.Healton says there’s an urgent need for a similar, sustained national public education campaign to combat the opioid epidemic. The best chance for that, she says, is a well-focused, master settlement of the pending opioid cases, something that a federal judge in Ohio has tried to pull off, so far unsuccessfully. Absent that, Healton worries that any deals struck by individual states and localities could wind up being too little, too late, to save many lives.“Compared with tobacco, the use of opioids is likely to grow,” she warns. “And it’s up to all of us to be a countervailing force.” First opioid settlement to fund ambitious addiction research centerlast_img read more

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Jharkhand lynching No interim relief for trio who uploaded video on Tik

first_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Top News After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan On Friday, the court directed the Cyber police to file a reply to the bail plea and adjourned the hearing for the next week. It, however, rejected their plea seeking interim protection.The complainant, in the case, was filed through a police personnel of Cyber police station, which claimed that in the backdrop of the incident of lynching in Jharkhand last month, a video was circulated on social media “disturbing the peace and harmony of society”. The police are likely to reply to the plea next week after which the court will consider whether or not to grant them anticipatory bail. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Hasnain Khan (21), Mudassir Shaikh (23) and Shadan Farooqui (23), all Tik Tok account holders, had approached the court seeking anticipatory bail days after the Mumbai Police filed an FIR against them at the Cyber police station for promoting enmity with common intent.In the anticipatory bail plea, the men claimed that in the video, on the basis of which the FIR was filed, the audio used by them was uploaded by the social media application Tik Tok. “Thereby (the application) gave a medium and asked its users to make video on the same. Already innumerable people had made a Tik Tok video through the said audio, however, the present applicants have been made scapegoat of the same… leaving the application clean and free,” the plea states.The plea, filed through advocates Ali Kaashif Khan and Nisha Arora, further states that the men have, in the past, uploaded several videos promoting religious harmony and peace and this has been “willingly suppressed” by the complainant. They added that they have deleted the video and tendered an apology nonetheless. The men are among the most-followed on Tik Tok in India. Advertising Mumbai, Mumbai news, TikTok, Tiktok viral video, Jharkhand lynching, Jharkhand lynching tiktok, Jharkhand lynching video, Indian express, latest news On Friday, the court directed the Cyber police to file a reply to the bail plea and adjourned the hearing for the next week. It, however, rejected their plea seeking interim protection.A sessions court on Friday refused to provide interim protection from arrest to three men accused of uploading an “objectionable” video on mobile app Tik Tok following a lynching incident in Jharkhand last month. Written by Sadaf Modak | Mumbai | Updated: July 13, 2019 10:43:18 am Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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As Biden looms Trump is still running against Obama

first_img Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file It took all of 1 minute, 9 seconds for President Donald Trump to go after his predecessor Friday — just 1 minute, 9 seconds to reengage in a debate that has consumed much of his own time in office over who was the better president.It was former President Barack Obama who started the policy of separating children from their parents at the border, Trump claimed falsely, and it was Obama who had such a terrible relationship with North Korea that he was about to go to war. Obama had it easy on the economy, Trump added, but let America’s allies walk all over him.The criticisms, often distorted, are familiar, but Trump has turned increasingly to Obama in recent days as a political foil. It is less common for presidents to take on predecessors who are more popular than they are; Obama was viewed favorably by 63% of those surveyed by Gallup last year, while Trump’s job approval rating is 41%.But Trump recognizes that his political base wanted, and still wants, someone who would be seen as fighting against Obama. Especially as Biden stumps the country on his record in the Obama administration, Trump sees a political advantage in taking down his predecessor and trying to lift himself as an outsider taking on a system he has led for over two years.“Tell Biden that NATO has taken total advantage of him and President Obama,” Trump said Friday. “Biden didn’t know what the hell he was doing, and neither did President Obama. NATO was taking advantage of — now they’re paying.”“President Obama and Vice President Biden,” he added, “they didn’t have a clue. They got taken advantage of by China, by NATO, by every country they did business with.”By Trump’s indictment, Obama was too soft on China’s trade abuses and too easy on NATO allies who were not spending enough on their own defense, two issues that the current president has pressed much more vigorously. Trump in recent days has also blamed Obama for a dispute with Turkey, a NATO ally, over its purchase of S-400 missile systems from Russia.In leveling his criticisms at Obama, however, Trump routinely stretches the facts. As he has repeatedly, Trump insisted Friday that had Obama remained in office, he would have gone to war with North Korea, a claim dismissed as ludicrous by the former president’s advisers.In recent days, Trump has added a new claim — that Obama tried to meet with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, only to be rebuffed, an assertion for which he offered no evidence.“He called Kim Jong Un on numerous occasions to meet. President Obama wanted to meet with Kim Jong Un. And Kim Jong Un said no,” Trump said Friday. “Numerous occasions he called. And right now we have a very nice relationship.”After Trump floated this while in Asia last weekend, Obama’s final national security adviser, Susan Rice, used an expletive to deny it. “At the risk of stating the obvious, this is horse-sh*t,” she wrote on Twitter, asterisk and all.Rhodes, her deputy, repeated the denial Friday. “There is zero truth to the claim about wanting to meet Kim,” he said. “It’s completely made up and totally incoherent with his previous claim that Obama wanted to go to war with North Korea.”Other former Obama-era officials have publicly disputed the notion as well, including James Clapper, who was director of national intelligence; Wendy Sherman, who was undersecretary of state; Daniel Russel, who was assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs; and Jeremy Bash, who was chief of staff at the CIA and later the Pentagon.Trump has also sought to rewrite the history of his own family separation policy at the border, telling audiences that it was Obama who started it and the current president who stopped it.“President Obama built those cells. They were in 2014,” Trump said last weekend at a news conference in Osaka, Japan. He added, “I just say this: They had a separation policy. Right? I ended it.”He was correct that the Obama administration built some of the detention facilities that have been at the center of the latest furor over the treatment of migrants detained at the border, but they were never meant for the long-term detention of children.Moreover, while the Obama administration did break up families, it was relatively rare and typically in cases of doubt about the relationship between a child and an accompanying adult. Since 2011, when he explored running for president against Obama, Trump has had a singular obsession with the 44th president.He repeatedly questioned Obama’s citizenship as part of the false “birther” conspiracy. As president, Obama struck back at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner in 2011, when he roasted the reality television star as a lightweight while Trump sat grim-faced.Since then, Trump has been determined to minimize or unravel Obama’s accomplishments and lately has even suggested that his predecessor was behind a deep-state conspiracy with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to thwart his 2016 candidacy.While other presidents have blamed their predecessors for various national ills — including Obama, who in his first term regularly pointed to former President George W. Bush — Trump takes it further than most. More Explained Advertising Trump’s administration announced a “zero tolerance policy” in April 2018 that resulted in nearly 3,000 children being forcibly separated from parents. After an outcry, Trump signed an executive order two months later directing officials to end the practice of family separation. Best Of Express Advertising In part, that reflects Trump’s long-standing fixation with the former president. But it may also stem from the fact that Obama’s vice president, Joe Biden, remains the Democratic front-runner in the 2020 election.“If you look at what we’ve done, and if you look at what we’ve straightened out, the — I call it the ‘Obama-Biden mess,’” he told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House before leaving Washington for a weekend at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey. “We’re straightening it out.”The president’s focus on Obama after about 2 1/2 years in office was even more intense during a trip to Japan and South Korea last weekend, when Trump repeatedly raised the subject of his predecessor without being asked, assailing him on a variety of domestic and foreign policy fronts.“When in a corner, Trump falls back on the only organizing principle he has, which is attacking Obama — and usually lying about it,” said Benjamin Rhodes, a former deputy national security adviser to Obama. “I wouldn’t read anything more into it than that.” Related News By New York Times |Washington | Published: July 6, 2019 7:49:36 am Explained: Trump’s immigrant policy; what the ICE planned, and why NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Donald Trump and Democrats clash over President’s ‘racist’ tweets Advertising Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief They’re not afraid As Biden looms, Trump is still running against Obama The criticisms, often distorted, are familiar, but Trump has turned increasingly to Obama in recent days as a political foil. 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We will find you DNA search used to nab Golden State Killer

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Geneticists quickly speculated this approach could identify many people from an unknown DNA sequence. But to quantify just how many, Erlich and colleagues took a closer look at the MyHeritage database, which contains 1.28 million DNA profiles of individuals looking at their family history. (Erlich is chief science officer of the ancestry DNA testing company.) If you live in the United States and are of European ancestry, there’s a 60% chance you have a third cousin or closer relative in this database, the team projected. Their success rate was similar when they did searches for 30 random profiles in GEDmatch. (The odds drop to 40% for someone of sub-Saharan African ancestry in the MyHeritage database.)Assuming you have a relative in one of these databases, what are the chances police could find you from an unidentified DNA sample, the way they nabbed the alleged Golden State Killer? To find out, Erlich and colleagues combined the MyHeritage database information with family trees, and demographic data such as rough age and likely geographic location. On average, that allowed them to use a hypothetical DNA sequence to home in on 17 “suspects” from a pool of about 850 people, the team reports today in Science.GEDmatch likely only encompasses about 0.5% of the U.S. adult population, but millions of Americans are using DNA ancestry testing services. Once the GEDmatch figure rises to 2%, more than 90% of people of European descent will have a third cousin or closer relative and could be found in this way. “It’s surprising how small the database needs to be,” says population geneticist Noah Rosenberg of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was not involved with the work.Rosenberg and colleagues showed last year that a profile in a consumer DNA database can be matched up with the same person’s profile in law enforcement forensic DNA databases, even though they use a different, smaller set of DNA markers. Today in Cell, they report that more than 30% of individuals in the forensic databases can also be linked to a sibling, parent, or child in a consumer database. The two types of databases combined could make it even easier to find a suspect from a DNA sample. The linked consumer DNA profile could also reveal physical appearance or medical information for a criminal or their relatives, such as genes for eye color or a disease, even though the forensic databases aren’t supposed to contain that kind of information. “More can be done with them than has been claimed,” Rosenberg says.Although these studies are encouraging news for solving crimes, they raise privacy concerns for law-abiding citizens, Erlich says. One possible solution suggested by his team is that the consumer DNA testing companies digitally encrypt a customer’s data and that GEDMatch only allow these encrypted files to be uploaded. That way a law enforcement agency couldn’t upload DNA sequence data from its own lab without an ancestry company’s cooperation. (The police can’t just pretend to be a customer and send crime scene DNA samples to companies like 23andMe because the company’s sequencing machines typically can’t process scant, degraded DNA samples.)Erlich also thinks U.S. officials need to revisit federal rules protecting people who volunteer for research studies. A recently revised guideline for biomedical researchers, called the Common Rule, assumes that a research participant can’t easily be identified from their anonymized DNA profile. But in its paper, Erlich’s team used GEDMatch to identify a woman who was part of a study using her anonymized DNA profile and birth date, which is often publicly available to researchers.Genetic policy experts agree that changes to how genealogy databases and DNA sequencing firms operate or are regulated are needed. The digital signature might be “a partial solution,” says law professor Natalie Ram of the University of Baltimore in Maryland. But all the players in the direct-to-consumer DNA sequencing industry would have to agree to this scheme, she notes. “If not, we’re back to square one.”Instead, she and others recently argued in Science that states and Congress should pass laws limiting situations where law enforcement can use genealogy databases to find suspects. It may be reasonable for a murder case, but not for a petty crime, Ram says. “Finding the right balance is important.” Randy Pench/TNS/Newscom By Jocelyn KaiserOct. 11, 2018 , 2:00 PM If you’re white, live in the United States, and a distant relative has uploaded their DNA to a public ancestry database, there’s a good chance an internet sleuth can identify you from a DNA sample you left somewhere. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that by combining an anonymous DNA sample with some basic information such as someone’s rough age, researchers could narrow that person’s identity to fewer than 20 people by starting with a DNA database of 1.3 million individuals.Such a search could potentially allow the identification of about 60% of white Americans from a DNA sample—even if they have never provided their own DNA to an ancestry database. “In a few years, it’s really going to be everyone,” says study leader Yaniv Erlich, a computational geneticist at Columbia University.The study was sparked by the April arrest of the alleged “Golden State Killer,” a California man accused of a series of decades-old rapes and murders. To find him—and more than a dozen other criminal suspects since then—law enforcement agencies first test a crime scene DNA sample, which could be old blood, hair, or semen, for hundreds of thousands of DNA markers—signposts along the genome that vary among people, but whose identity in many cases are shared with blood relatives. They then upload the DNA data to GEDmatch, a free online database where anyone can share their data from consumer DNA testing companies such as 23andMe and Ancestry.com to search for relatives who have submitted their DNA. Searching GEDMatch’s nearly 1 million profiles revealed several relatives who were the equivalent to third cousins to the crime scene DNA linked to the Golden State Killer. Other information such as genealogical records, approximate age, and crime locations then allowed the sleuths to home in on a single person. Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected Golden State Killercenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email We will find you: DNA search used to nab Golden State Killer can home in on about 60% of white Americanslast_img read more

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Believe in Atlantis These archaeologists want to win you back to science

first_imgThese outlandish beliefs have been circulating for decades, but archaeologists like Anderson are now mobilizing to counter them. They are taking to Twitter, blogs, podcasts, YouTube, and newspapers to debunk false claims and explain real archaeological methods, and they plan to compare notes this week during a symposium at the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meeting here. “My profession … needs to do a better job of speaking out,” Anderson says.He and others are alarmed by the rising popularity of pseudoarchaeological ideas. According to the annual Survey of American Fears by Chapman University in Orange, California, which catalogs paranormal beliefs, in 2018, 41% of Americans believed that aliens visited Earth in the ancient past, and 57% believed that Atlantis or other advanced ancient civilizations existed. Those numbers are up from 2016, when the survey found that 27% of Americans believed in ancient aliens and 40% believed in Atlantis.“I look at these numbers and say … something has gone massively wrong,” Anderson says. He can’t say exactly what is driving the rise in such ideas, but cable TV shows like Ancient Aliens (which has run for 13 seasons) propagate them, as does the internet.These beliefs may seem harmless or even amusing, says Jason Colavito, an author in Albany who covers pseudoarchaeology in books and on his blog. But they have “a dark side,” he says. Almost all such claims assume that ancient non-European societies weren’t capable of inventing sophisticated architecture, calendars, math, and sciences like astronomy on their own. “It’s racist at its core,” says Kenneth Feder, an archaeologist at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, who is slated to present at the SAA session and began to write about the dangers of these ideas long before most other scholars paid attention to them.Adding to archaeologists’ sense of responsibility is that “many of these ideas started within mainstream archaeology,” says Jeb Card, an archaeologist at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. “We have to own these stories.”For example, white settlers and early archaeologists in 19th century North America excavated elaborate pre-Columbian burial mounds—but ascribed them to a lost “moundbuilder race” that was killed by the ancestors of Native Americans. Former President Andrew Jackson used those ideas to justify displacing Native Americans from their lands.Today, white nationalists make similar claims. To argue for Europeans’ deep roots in the Americas, they have latched onto Vinland, a short-lived medieval Viking settlement in eastern Canada, and the “Solutrean hypothesis,” which argues that the Americas were first peopled by arrivals from Western Europe. Neither claim started as pseudoarchaeology—Vinland was real, and the Solutrean hypothesis was proposed by mainstream archaeologists, then tested and ruled out—but they have been twisted for ideological ends. A white supremacist accused of murdering two people on a train in Portland, Oregon, in 2017 included the words “Hail Vinland!!!” in a Facebook post less than a month before the attack.“It’s really a life-or-death issue,” says Stephennie Mulder, an archaeologist and art historian at the University of Texas in Austin, who organized a 30 March symposium there called “Aliens, Atlantis, and Aryanism: ‘Fake News’ in Archaeology and Heritage,” at which Anderson was the keynote speaker.Yet archaeologists have historically been hesitant to tackle pseudoarchaeology. As the field matured in the 20th century, archaeologists moved into the academy and abdicated the public sphere, says Sara Head, an independent cultural resources archaeologist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the author of the Archaeological Fantasies blog, who is co-organizing the SAA session. “We’ve created a vacuum” that pseudoarchaeology has filled.Today, “Most archaeological research is unavailable to the public,” she says, obscured by jargon and locked behind paywalls. “But you want something from pseudoarchaeology? I can find you 15 references,” all easily accessible online and on TV.Re-engaging with the public is an uphill battle, Head says. Debunking specific claims, as Anderson did with Pakal’s “spaceship,” is merely a first step. To make a lasting impact, she and others say, archaeologists must proactively share their work and, in particular, explain their methods step by step. That’s important to counter the common pseudoarchaeological claim that researchers are hiding evidence for aliens or Atlantis.This isn’t easy work, especially online. All the women interviewed for this article have been harassed online after tackling pseudoarchaeological interpretations. Mulder recently fielded replies that included a knife emoji after she tweeted about research showing that people of diverse ancestries, rather than only Western Europeans, lived in Roman Britain. Colavito reports receiving death threats after a host of Ancient Aliens urged his fans to send Colavito hate mail.Ironically, the popularity of pseudoarchaeology also reveals intense public interest in the past. Anderson understands: His own interest in archaeology was spurred at age 18 when he read a book about a now-vanished advanced civilization that supposedly helped develop the cultures of ancient Egypt and the Maya. He was inspired to take archaeology courses in college—and found that the reality was even more exciting than the myths. “Archaeology was even better than [the book] had presented it.” Email Mayan King K’inich Janaab’ Pakal is not taking off in a spaceship in this image from his seventh century sarcophagus, but falling into the underworld. By Lizzie WadeApr. 9, 2019 , 5:15 PM CHRONICLE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO In February, the popular podcast The Joe Rogan Experience referred to an idea made famous by some books and TV shows: that an image of the Mayan King K’inich Janaab’ Pakal, carved onto the lid of his sarcophagus when he died in 683 C.E., shows him taking off in a spaceship. Host Rogan was skeptical of the notion, which has been used to argue that extraterrestrial visitors seeded sophisticated ancient societies like the Maya. He asked what mainstream archaeologists made of it.For David Anderson, that request was a call to action. Anderson, an archaeologist at Radford University in Virginia, jumped on Twitter: “Dear @joerogan, speaking as a ‘mainstream’ archaeologist … it depicts [Pakal] falling into the underworld at the moment of his death.” The rocket-propelling “fire” below Pakal is a personification of the underworld, and the “spaceship” is a world tree, a common feature in Mayan art. Rogan retweeted Anderson’s thread, bringing him more than 1000 likes and many grateful comments—plus some angry ones.Pakal’s supposed seat in a spaceship is just one example of what Anderson and others call “pseudoarchaeology,” which ignores the cultural context of ancient artifacts and uses them to support predetermined ideas, rather than test hypotheses, about the past. Common beliefs include that aliens helped build the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids, that refugees escaping Atlantis brought technology to cultures around the world, and that European immigrants were the original inhabitants of North America.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Believe in Atlantis? 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Ovarian cancer risk reduced among women taking modern combined oral contraceptive pills

first_imgThe older forms of birth control pills were higher on estrogen and progesterone and were widely used in the 1980s. These pills had also been seen to be protective against ovarian cancer. This new study looked at the modern low dose birth control pills. Authors wrote, “Based on our results, contemporary combined hormonal contraceptives are still associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age, with patterns similar to those seen with older combined oral products.” These pills protect against almost all forms of ovarian cancer, explained the team led by Dr Lisa Iversen, a researcher at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.At present nearly 100 million women globally use hormonal birth control says the United Nations. In 2012, 238,000 women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer found the International Agency for Research on Cancer killing 150,000.The study looked at data from the Danish Sex Hormone Register Study. This database contained records of Danish women aged between 15 and 79 and followed them up from 1995 to 2014. The team then eliminated women who have undergone treatments for infertility or cancers or for blood clots, thrombosis etc. and included the rest of the women. Women aged between 15 and 49 years – or those in their reproductive age were only included in the study. This whittling down the database resulted in over two million women who were included in the analysis.Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerNow these women were divided into three groups; The results showed that the risk of ovarian cancer was greatest among women who had never used hormonal contraception and lower among women who had used these methods of contraception in the past. They noted that longer the women were using hormonal birth control, the stronger was the protection against the cancer. The protection seemed to reduce once the hormonal contraceptives were stopped they noted. The study found that using hormonal contraceptives prevented around 21 percent of ovarian cancers in the study population. Women who are presently taking any form of hormonal contraceptive are at a 42 per cent lower cancer risk, the study found. The researchers further looked at women who were using progestin only pills and found that no similar protection was offered.Source: https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3609 By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDSep 27 2018According to a new study women of reproductive age who are using the modern oral contraceptive pills or patches and rings that contain a combination of estrogen and progesterone are at a reduced risk for ovarian cancer. The study was published in the recent issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ). Image Credit: Image Point Fr / Shutterstock Those who had never used birth control pills or other hormonal contraception, Those who were either using it at present or within the last one year Those who were using these contraceptive methods earlier but had stopped nowlast_img read more

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Young adults shying away from alcohol

first_img Source:https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-018-5995-3 Related StoriesRecreational cannabis legalization could impact alcohol industry, research showsAlcohol reduction associated with improved viral suppression in women living with HIVExcess grey matter in the brain can predict escalating drinking behavior in teensThe study found that teetotallers among the 16 to 24 year olds has risen from 18 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2015 and abstinence from alcohol is gradually becoming “mainstream”.The team of researchers from the University College London conducted a survey and noted that nearly 50 percent of the participants had not touched alcohol in the past week.This number was around 35 percent in 2005, they noted. The information for this study was derived from the annual Health Survey for England where 10,000 young adults were included.The team found that “lifetime abstainers” from alcohol rose from 9 percent in 2005 to 17 percent in 2015. Binge drinking too declined from 27 percent to 18 percent over these 10 years. Similarly harmful drinking declined from 43 percent in 2005 to 28 percent in 2015.The study concluded that young adults today were drinking less than their parents did but alcohol consumption rates failed to decline among smokers, those with mental health conditions and also among certain ethnic minorities.Dr Linda Ng Fat, who led this study said in a statement, “Increases in non-drinking among young people were found across a broad range of groups, including those living in northern or southern regions of England, among the white population, those in full-time education, in employment and across all social classes and healthier groups.The increase in young people who choose not to drink alcohol suggests that this behaviour maybe becoming more acceptable, whereas risky behaviours such as binge drinking may be becoming less normalised.”According to Dr. Fat these results are also consistent with other findings such as a decline in smoking and recreational drugs abuse along with other risky behaviors. Image Credit: milias1987 / Shutterstockcenter_img By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDOct 11 2018A new study has found that more young adults in England, aged between 16 and 24 are turning away from alcohol consumption and this has made the current generation one of the most sober in recent times. The study was published in the recent issue of the journal BMC Public Health.last_img read more

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Water fluoridation contributes to urinary fluoride levels in pregnant women in Canada

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 11 2018A new study led by York University researchers has found that fluoride levels in urine are twice as high for pregnant women living in Canadian cities where fluoride is added to public drinking water as for those living in cities that do not add fluoride to public water supplies.The study “Community Water Fluoridation and Urinary Fluoride Concentrations in a National Sample of Pregnant Women in Canada” was published today in  Environmental Health Perspectives. It is the first study in North America to examine how fluoride in water contributes to urinary fluoride levels in pregnant women. The research was conducted as part of a larger study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) investigating whether early life exposure to fluoride affects the developing brain.”We found that fluoride in drinking water was the major source of exposure for pregnant women living in Canada. Women living in fluoridated communities have two times the amount of fluoride in their urine as women living in non-fluoridated communities,” said Christine Till, an associate professor of Psychology in York’s Faculty of Health and lead author on the study.The Maternal Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study recruited 2,001 pregnant women between 2008 and 2011. The women lived in 10 large cities across Canada. Seven of the cities (Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa, Sudbury, Halifax, Edmonton and Winnipeg) added fluoride to municipal water while three (Vancouver, Montreal and Kingston) did not.Urine samples were collected during each trimester of pregnancy for over 1,500 women. Fluoride levels in municipal water treatment plants that provided water to each women’s home were obtained. Information about each woman’s demographics, lifestyle and medical history was also collected.Related StoriesResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionStudy offers clues about how to prevent brain inflammation in Alzheimer’sStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingIn addition to fluoridated water, sources of fluoride can include toothpastes, mouth rinses, as well as processed beverages and food, especially those made with fluoridated water. Beyond water, products such as tea have previously been found to have high concentrations of natural fluoride.In this study, fluoride level in water was the main determinant of fluoride level in the women’s urine. Higher consumption of black tea was also correlated with higher levels of urinary fluoride in pregnant women.The levels of fluoride among pregnant women living in fluoridated communities in Canada were similar with levels reported in a prior study of pregnant women living in Mexico City where fluoride is added to table salt.”This finding is concerning because prenatal exposure to fluoride in the Mexican sample has been associated with lower IQ in children. New evidence published today in Environment International also reported an association between higher levels of fluoride in pregnancy and inattentive behaviours among children in the same Mexican sample,” said Till.The research team, including experts from Simon Fraser University, Université Laval, Indiana University, University of Montreal and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, is investigating whether prenatal exposure to fluoride in Canadian children results in IQ deficits, similar to the Mexican study.Fluoride has been added to public drinking water in Canadian and American communities since the 1940s as a means of preventing tooth decay. Today, about 40 per cent of Canadians and 74 percent of the U.S. population on public water supplies receive fluoridated water. Source:https://www.yorku.ca/last_img read more

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Celprogen successfully prints 3D Brains from brain stem cells to study neurological

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 1 2018Celprogen Inc., a leader in the Stem Cell Research and Therapeutics industry for stem cell research since 2002, today announced that they have successfully finished printing 3D Brains from brain stem cells for studying neurological disease stages. The poster on this work will be presented at the Annual Neuroscience meeting in San Diego, Nov 3rd 2018. The 3D printed human brain was utilized for studying “The role of Microglia activation and deactivation in neurological diseases.” Celprogen has been able to identify and characterize 11 lead compounds that are potential drug candidates for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Glioblastoma patients.The present invention relates to 3D organ printing programs at Celprogen that identifies potential future use in transplant of major organ systems. At present, Celprogen is validating the 3D human printed heart, pancreas, liver, hair follicle and brain for toxicology and drug discovery research. Source:http://www.celprogen.com/last_img read more

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Multidisciplinary team successfully performs complex surgery on patient suffering from enlarged skull

Dec 14 2018A 2-year-old girl with an extreme form of hydrocephalus could someday lead a more normal life, thanks to a remarkable surgical intervention aided by state-of-the-art technologies used by a leading pediatric team supervised by two assistants professors of medicine at Université de Montréal.The child, who underwent two operations at CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital in Montreal, including a total cranial vault reconstruction, could not even sit upright because of the size and weight of her head. Her brain was being compressed by an excess of cerebrospinal fluid.Related StoriesHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Study: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needUsing virtual modelling and three-dimensional technology supported by a 3D printer, and after a 12-hour operation, surgeons were able to open the child’s abnormally large skull and reconstruct it to closer to normal dimensions. Prior to the procedure, her skull contained three litres of cerebrospinal fluid, while the normal amount is 150 millilitres. To achieve this amazing feat, the team made a detailed model of the girl’s skull, numbering the sections so they could later put them back in place, somewhat like a puzzle.”Our little patient suffered from an enlarged skull, otherwise known as extreme macrocrania,” said Dr. Alexander Weil, a pediatric neurosurgeon (MD, FRCSC, FAANS, FACS) at CHU Sainte-Justine. “If we hadn’t operated, she would have continued to be weighed down and immobilized by the size and weight of her head. This surgery gives us hope that she will now be able to develop and live more normally.” Added Dr. Daniel Borsuk, the hospital centre’s head of plastic surgery (MD, MBA, FRCSC, FACS): “The collaborative efforts of an experienced multidisciplinary team, which made it possible to successfully carry out this complex surgery.”The surgeons expressed their heartfelt thanks to all the health professionals who took part, as well as to the child’s family for placing their trust in the medical team. Source:https://www.umontreal.ca/ read more

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