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Stars Support Handbags For Hospices

first_imgEver fancied owning a designer bag? Do you love the look but not the price tag? Handbags For Hospices is a brilliant new fundraising event at which gives you the chance to get your hands on a bag that may previously have graced the arm of a glamorous celebrity.Davina McCall, Paloma Faith, Gemma Arterton and Zoe Ball have all donated bags for the launch event in Brighton in February 2013, which is in aid of the Martlets, the Brighton-based hospice.The top 100 bags will be part of a silent auction on Thursday 28th February, the daytime event is open from midday to 6pm, open for anyone to come along and place a bid.To buy tickets for the glamorous evening event, email info@handbagsforhospices.comDate: Thursday 28th February
Daytime Midday – 6pm
Evening 7pm – 10pm
Venue: Hotel du Vin, Ship Street, Brighton
Tickets: £5 for the evening event email info@handbagsforhospices.comFind out more about The Martlets here.last_img read more

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Royal Baby Gets Gift From Hearing Loss Charity

first_imgNew parents HRH Duke of Cambridge and HRH Duchess of Cambridge will break with centuries of royal tradition and will not be employing a nanny for the first few weeks of HRH Prince George of Cambridge’s life.Action on Hearing Loss, (previously the RNID) has stepped in with the ultimate baby monitor for the hands-on couple. As well as featuring the usual sound monitor it also has state-of-the-art video monitoring technologies so the royal couple can not only hear but see their little bundle of joy sleeping soundly.Baby care and safety is the major consideration for any parent, and the royal couple have already shown their knowledge and dexterity in this matter with the baby car seat they expertly used upon leaving hospital. However, with HRH Prince of Cambridge now at home, the royal couple will be familiarising themselves with sleepless nights. With no nanny to assist them, Action on Hearing Loss hope their gift will provide that all important sense of security that all new parents wish for, whether deaf or hearing.The Action on Hearing Loss approved £130.00, Amplicomms Watch and Care V120 baby monitor is an ideal solution for deaf, hard of hearing or any parent who wants to keep an extra safe eye on their little one. It has a built in camera and screen to monitor movement as well as sound. A vibrating pad slips under your pillow to alert you at night and flashing coloured lights alert you during the day. The camera automatically switches to infrared night vision in darkness, enabling good visibility at all times. Parents can have a two-way conversation and even monitor the temperature of the room remotely.Chief Executive of Action on Hearing Loss, Paul Breckell says, “Everyone at Action on Hearing Loss sends their sincere congratulations to the royal family. As a charity with a Royal Patron, HRH The Duke of York, we are particularly delighted and felt it wholly appropriate to send the family a practical gift that we know both hearing and non-hearing parents feel safe to rely on.”The baby monitor is available from Action On Hearing Loss here or call the sales team on =44-(0)1733-361199 or Textphone +44-(0)1733-238020.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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Roadstarr Motorsports Partners With Toys For Tots Access Hollywood And Soles4Souls

first_imgRoadstarr Motorsports is partnering with Soles4Souls, Toys for Tots, and the Los Angeles County Sheriff Department for their private celebrity event at company headquarters in Los Angeles, CA.To ensure that families in need experience a special Christmas this season, Roadstarr Motorsports has enlisted celebrity hosts Columbus Short (Scandal), Wilmer Valderrama (From Dusk till Dawn), and other industry tastemakers to lead the charge.“Every child deserves to feel loved and appreciated, especially at Christmas,” said Co-Founder Hassan Iddrissu. “Every donation collected will go directly to helping a family’s holiday be a little brighter. I’m counting on all of our special media and celebrity guests to support Soles4Souls and Toys for Tots.”During the special event, Roadstarr will collect new, unwrapped presents (toys, clothing, and shoes) on December 20, 2014 from 2PM-6PM at 8964 National Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90034. With the help of Access Hollywood, and event hosts, on December 21, 2014, Roadstarr will deliver Christmas early for those selected charities and families. The entire event will be taped for replay on Access Hollywood Live.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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An Evening With Suggs And Friends For Pancreatic Cancer UK

first_imgMadness and Rudimental will perform to raise money for Pancreatic Cancer UK early next month.An Evening With Suggs And FriendsThe “An Evening With Suggs And Friends” concert will take place at Emirates Stadium in London on March 12, and will include champagne reception, dinner and auction.Tickets can be found here.last_img

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Outrage over WWII scalping claim

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA-An author in France has made the claim that Aboriginal soldiers scalped and desecrated the bodies of their enemies during the Second World War.The claim has been met with scorn and derision from academics and Aboriginal veterans on both sides of the Atlantic.University of the Fraser Valley professor Scott Sheffield talked to APTN National News about the issue.last_img

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Senate continues study into Metis identity

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Senate Aboriginal peoples committee was in Edmonton recently as part of a tour of Northern and Western communities.They’ve invited speakers from across the prairies to talk about what it means to be Metis.This is the first fact-finding study of Metis identity ever undertaken in Canada.The committee is also meeting with elders and leaders of Metis organizations.The panel chair says the Metis share common challenges across the country.last_img

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Lake St Martin residents demand to go home

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt’s been nearly two years but thousands of First Nation flood evacuees are still waiting to go home and people are asking one question of the Manitoba government – what are they prepared to do?Lake St. Martin residents were evacuated to Winnipeg and Chief Adrian Sinclair says the flood that destroyed their community was manmade.“Those are the issues we’re here to address with the premier, the manmade flooding they caused to surrounding communities to save Winnipeg and southern Manitoba by flooding the surrounding First Nations reserves. That is why we’re here today. To get our voices heard,” said Sinclair.Many people came to the Manitoba legislature to press the provincial government to get moving on promises, the get people back home.“People are still displaced and we want awareness on the issue. People are forgotten. People are stressed and depressed and want to go home. They don’t want to live in the city anymore,” said Lake St. Martin resident Myrle Ballard.But Premier Greg Selinger said his government is doing all it can and he’s already offered temporary housing or a hotels until permanent solutions can be found.“It’s a choice people make. If they want to be in temporary housing on a site or if they want to be elsewhere that’s their choice as well. We’re making sure that people are safe and taken care of and children are getting their education wherever they’re located,” said Selinger.That falls flat according to opposition parties.“The premier owes the people of Lake St. Martin…an apology for the fact they were flooded last year, artificialy, in order to save other people,” said Liberal leader Jon Gerrard.As APTN National News reporter Melissa Ridgen reports the people are faced with only one option – wait until they get to go home.last_img read more

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VIDEO Opening day of the AFN special assembly in Winnipeg

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe opening day of the Assembly of First Nations special assembly kicked off Tuesday in Winnipeg.Over the next three days chiefs from across the country will meet and elect a new leader.The AFN says 639 chiefs are eligible to vote.Three hundred had registered by Tuesday morning.APTN’s Tim Fontaine has more.last_img

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Gladue writers hired in four Ontario cities

first_imgAPTN National NewsLegal-Aid Ontario is announcing a much needed expansion of its Gladue system by hiring four new writers in Sudbury, Sault St. Marie, North Bay and Windsor.Glaude reports take into account the systemic factors that may have led an Aboriginal person to the prisoner’s box in the courtroom.APTN’s Delaney Windigo has this story.last_img

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Mikmaq leaders concerned over shift in social assistance rates

first_imgAPTN National NewsMi’kmaq leaders in Atlantic Canada are concerned over the impact changes to social assistance programs will have on communities.Starting next year, Canada’s rates will mirror those used by the province.But many say there are already big gaps in the standard of living.And that change will only make things worse.APTN’s Trina Roache reports.troache@aptn.ca@trinaroachelast_img

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Man accused of killing Cree woman in Ottawa has multiple versions of

first_imgKenneth Jackson APTN National NewsOTTAWA – Adrian Daou wanted out of segregation so badly he was willing to confess to a murder to make it happen – the murder of Jennifer Stewart, a Cree mother who was brutally killed in Ottawa August 2010.“I was thinking of telling you guys something I did to go to the pen tonight. I’m just trying to get out of (segregation) … I’m just looking to get more room,” Daou, 24, told two Ottawa police detectives in a jailhouse interview on Feb. 25, 2013, the first of two confessions the jury heard Monday in the first-degree murder trial.It doesn’t work that way, the cops tell him.“Jennifer … I did it,” said Daou. “ I did the crime.”“You killed Jennifer?” one of the officers asked.“Yep,” he said – with a knife, specifically a military knife and he did because “he wanted to get his anger out.”The jury trial entered its third day Monday with the jury already hearing from a jail guard and a pathologist. Daou, despite confessing twice, has pleaded not guilty. Stewart, 36, was struggling through addictions when her body was found Aug, 20, 2010 by a person walking their dog.The jury heard Monday Daou say he lured Stewart to a location on Alice Street in the Ottawa community of Vanier where he “cut, cut, cut” her in the pitch black of a parking lot next to a small apartment building just before midnight.But when pressed he told police the “murder weapon” was an axe and he hit her on the head “four to seven” times.“That’s the truth. I swear on it. I took an axe and that’s when …,” he said stopping himself.He had been angry for a while knowing he was going to jail for six months for trafficking drugs.Soon his anger turned into the idea of murder he said.“My goal for that day was to kill someone,” said Daou who spotted Stewart walking near Montreal Road and offered to sell her some “dope” for $20.The police asked why Stewart.“Why her? I was looking around and she was the one who came up as the best possible choice,” he said.Police asked if Stewart offered anything else to him and Daou quickly said she didn’t.They ask again later, this time point blank if it was sex she was offering in return for drugs.“Sorry, it’s a legitimate question,” one of the officers said.Again, Daou said it wasn’t. He said she had money on her.So they walked through the community to the spot Daou said he wanted to kill her, close to the home he was sharing with his dad and brother at the time.But police wanted to know more. They rushed to a judge to get an order to remove Daou from the jail and take him to the police headquarters for a formal interview the next day.This time the jury didn’t just hear Daou admit to killing Stewart, they got to see him as this interview was videotaped.“The murder … I killed Jennifer Stewart. I’m the one who did it. Nobody else,” he said off the top.Then jury heard Daou explain he was a budding rapper and killing someone would help his career.But really it was while he was at work that day that he knew he was going to kill someone.By the time he got home, smoked some weed and drank a bottle of liquor he was ready.Male or female, it didn’t matter: “It was about the killing.”Dressed in cargo shorts, a hoodie and Nike “gangster” shoes he set out on his bike around 8 p.m.He drove around Vanier, stopping near a liquor store to smoke another joint.Then he saw Stewart, just past 10 p.m. walking by herself. This time he remembered it was on Marier Street near Montreal Road. She was on the right-hand sidewalk.She wore a black coat and black jeans or “something.” No purse.He rolled up beside her and offered her some “dope.”This time it was for sex – the dope for a sex act.He said she agreed and followed.“She was, I guess, her usual way. She didn’t look like a happy person,” said Daou who had mentioned he sold drugs to her a couple times in the past so they sort of knew each other.They walked to the spot and he told her to wait by the corner of the building so he could rush home and get the drugs. This time in the interview he recalled the exact address: 120 Alice Street.But he was going home to get his axe and put on goggles.Police interrupted him.Det. John Monette, who was doing the interview, had concerns.“Right now, I’m not convinced you’re telling me the truth,” said Monette who asks Daou to show where he hit Stewart with an axe.Daou tries to explain but then asks for paper and pen.As he’s sketching he stops and asks what the weather is like.It was four degrees outside, Monette said.“Sometimes I try to remember, but this time I’m going to remember good,” said Daou. “I feel better (here) than in that little cell.”He shows he hit Stewart “five or six times” in the head and Monette asks if she ever put her hands up to defend herself.Daou said no, never.The jury had already heard Stewart fought like hell to save herself, so much so both of her hands were nearly severed.He showed Monette how hard he hit Stewart with an axe, vicious blows that struck his foot but never hurt him.After he killed her, Daou said he jumped through several backyards, went home to shower and put all the clothes in a bag. He said there was no blood on any of the clothes. He wrapped the axe in a red coat and put it in his room.He hopped back on his bike to go smoke another joint.During this trip he stopped to get a Red Bull and on his way back home went by the murder scene and poured a little out “to honour” Stewart.Then he stayed up writing lyrics before going back to work the next day.The trial continues Tuesday.kjackson@aptn.calast_img read more

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Mohawk mother wants to protect daughters name

first_imgKahente Horn-Miller. Submitted photo.Tom FennarioAPTN NewsLast Saturday Kahente Horn-Miller’s weekend was interrupted by a text message from her 25-year-old daughter Karonhioko’he.It read: “What can I do about this?”Karonhioko’he was contacted on social media by a filmmaker writing a script based on her name. The filmmaker wanted to know how to pronounce “Karonhioko’he” and was searching for more details regarding Mohawk culture.“You’re mining our language for profit, and it has to stop,” is how Horn-Miller describes her immediate reaction.The 46-year-old Kanien’kehà:ka (Mohawk) woman from Kahnawà:ke Mohawk Territory became further incensed when the filmmaker responded to the family’s concerns by stating “names aren’t covered by copyright law”.“When you are appropriating our names, and misusing them and misrepresenting us, that’s a whole other level of insult,” said Horn-Miller.This is because Kanien’kehà:ka custom places a great importance on naming newborns.“We are all supposed to have our own individual names, none of us are supposed to have the same names, which is a very different tradition in western society where multiple people have the same names,” explained Horn-Miller.“So when a baby is born it’s up to the family to help find the name. It’s a spiritual process because the name is associated with the birth of a child and the circumstances around the birth, the name comes out of our relationship, or that baby’s relationship to the natural world when they arrive.”For example, the name Karonhioko’he translates as “she takes the sky out of the water,” which was bestowed upon her after consultation with clan mothers. Which for Horn-Miller, begs the question, how did the filmmaker come across the name in the first place?“I went looking and we found this website ‘behindthename.com’, based out of British Columbia and lo and behold there was her name. And there was my name, and my sister Waneek’s name, and my mother’s name, and my niece’s name,” said Horn-Miller, who says the website complied when asked to have the names removed.“I’m encouraging other Indigenous people to look at the site, find other sites, and encourage them to take these names down because of how important they are to our people,” said Horn-Miller.When asked under what circumstances a non-Indigenous artist could incorporate Indigenous culture into their work, Horn-Miller said it must start with permission first.“You go to a community and say, ‘hey, I’m writing this script, I’d like to write about your people are you willing to share anything with me about this? There’s protocols around this, where we need to be asked first, not last,” explained Horn-Miller, who is an assistant professor at the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University.“For example at the university, we have very strict guidelines on how to do ethical research, where you now have to go to a community, you have to ask, ‘can I do this research in this community,’ then ‘can you help me do this, what kind of questions should I ask, who do I need to ask, what kind of research is useful to you? How can I give back?’ These are things we’re asking in the university, but this is not happening in artistic fields.”Horn-Miller isn’t the only one to articulate these thoughts. In his 2018 reference book, Elements of Indigenous Style Cree publisher and university professor Gregory Younging outlines twenty-two principles of culturally appropriate publishing practices, which include seeking permission, collaboration, not assuming copyright or public domain over oral stories or traditions, and sharing royalties with communities when using aspects of their culture.“Don’t just take our stories and tell them and think that it’s right and it’s okay, because it’s not,” said Horn-Miller, who added that the filmmaker has agreed to remove references to Karonhioko’he’s name from the script.However, Horn-Miller has since found a novel where her name and that of her sister’s is used. Despite her frustration, Horn-Miller hopes speaking about these incidents will deter people in the future from committing cultural appropriation, but without quashing sincere interest in Indigenous culture.“A majority of it we can’t share, but there are some things we should share, because of the importance of building these kids of bridges of understanding,” concluded Horn-Miller “but this has to happen in a proper way. With us, not for us and not over our heads.”tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

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Security caught oncam roughly detaining Indigenous woman at journalism conference

first_imgAPTN NewsVideo captured by reporters at a journalism conference in Winnipeg appears to show a security guard at a hotel where the event is taking place roughing up a young Indigenous woman he suspected of “prowling” cars according to hotel management.The incident at the Radisson Hotel located downtown took place Friday evening.The conference was wrapping up for the day and several journalists were congregating in the lobby when a security guard bee-lined for an Indigenous woman who appeared to be cutting through the lobby.“He stormed up to her and said ‘you’re under arrest’ and grabbed her arm,” said Beverly Andrews, a producer at APTN News. “That’s when he slammed her up against the wall.”“He was hauling her roughly over to a room and she fell down, her glasses fell off and broke and a ring flew off her finger,” said Trina Roache, a video journalist with APTN Investigates.Among the journalists watching the incident were eight APTN reporters, several of whom grabbed their phones and started recording as the security guard took the woman to a small locked room.You can hear on the video some people saying that he doesn’t have the power to arrest her and shouldn’t be detaining her alone in the room, while the female in his grip says “I didn’t f—ing touch no vehicles.”“My concern is he was so aggressive with her right in front of us, I was worried about her being in there with him alone,” said Roache. She can be heard saying “I don’t think this is cool” as another APTN journalist says “I don’t think this is legal” before the security guard shuts the door on them, with the woman inside. The province’s Petty Trespasses Act permits arrest without warrant by a person authorized by property owner if the arrested person was previously given notice to not come onto the owner’s property.It’s not clear if the woman received that warning.Some of the journalists went to look for management while APTN’s Nunavut video journalist Kent Driscoll went outside.He said five minutes after the  incident, the woman who had been detained emerged from the hotel.“I asked if she was OK and she said she was fine,” Driscoll said, and the woman carried on her way. The security guard came out soon after yelling to reporters that the woman was “back in the parkade.”The same security guard was working again Saturday and when questioned about the incident for this story, said “I’m not talking” and walked away.A front desk attendant said a manager “is not available” for questions.An email asking about the hotel’s security protocols was sent to Canad Inns, which owns the Radisson was returned late Monday afternoon.“Canad Inns is taking this matter seriously and is in the process of conducting its internal review,” said Lauren Beckwith, communications coordinator for Canad Inns corporate office.“As the review is ongoing and facts are still being confirmed, I’m unable to comment at this time.The Canadian Association of Journalists said the incident was “highly concerning.”“We are told the hotel management is investigating the incident,” said CAJ president Karyn Pugliese, who is also the executive director of news at APTN.“We have requested the security guard be kept away from our conference in the interest of ensuring our delegates feel safe.”She said the CAJ will follow up with management.There were 250 delegates from media across Canada in for the weekend conference.The Winnipeg Police Service said did not receive a call to the hotel Friday evening.The security guard in the video has by identified as a band member by the Lake Manitoba First Nation in Treaty 2 territory.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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NAFTA Deadlock on hard issues as round concludes under cloud of question

first_imgMEXICO CITY – Another round of NAFTA talks wrapped up with all key issues still deadlocked Tuesday as negotiators prepared to leave Mexico City with a plethora of question marks lingering over the trade deal.The negotiators made progress on a variety of technical files, nearly concluding some less-controversial chapters such as digital trade, sanitary measures, customs enforcement and telecommunications.But on hot-button files like autos, dairy, dispute resolution, and a U.S. idea to make it easier to terminate NAFTA, they cite no real progress. Sources from host country Mexico described a lingering standoff on multiple fronts, which Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland confirmed back in Ottawa.”I think our approach is to hope for the best, and prepare for the worst,” Freeland said outside the House of Commons, describing the state of the talks.”Canada is certainly prepared for any eventuality. As I’ve said, we want a good deal, not just any deal.”Canada and Mexico spent this round taking shots at the logic of some controversial U.S. proposals — demanding details about how they would work, and delivering presentations illustrating how they would hurt the U.S., too.That approach has frustrated the U.S. side.The Americans say that instead of delivering lectures, the other countries should be making counter-proposals.”I remain concerned about the lack of headway,” said U.S. trade czar Robert Lighthizer. “Thus far, we have seen no evidence that Canada or Mexico are willing to seriously engage on provisions that will lead to a rebalanced agreement.”I hope our partners will come to the table in a serious way so we can see meaningful progress before the end of the year.”Some media reports described the dynamic of this round as Canada and Mexico teaming up against the U.S. The front-page headline Tuesday in Mexico’s Excelsior newspaper declared, “Mexico and Canada form a common front against the U.S.”But some Mexicans vehemently rejected the idea of an organized Canada-Mexico tag-team.They said, for instance, that there are no pre-session strategy hurdles between Canada and Mexico. They said these countries simply have mutual interests on a few important files, such as autos, dispute settlement and professional visas. ”(But) gang up on the U.S.? No, no, no,” said one Mexican source, speaking on condition of anonymity, given the sensitivity of the matter.Mexico demonstrated at this round, however, that it’s willing to play hardball.It showed that two can play at the game of zero-sum thinking and hostile tit-for-tat. On the issue of Buy American, the Mexicans said they could respond with equivalent Buy Mexico policies for public projects — and the biggest loser would be the U.S. That’s because American companies do more construction business in Mexico than vice-versa, they argued.”We would all lose,” said another Mexican source familiar with the talks.”But the U.S. loses more.”The Mexico City round ended with uncertainty on multiple fronts. Two major question marks are: will President Donald Trump start pulling out of NAFTA as a negotiating ploy? And what happens if a deal isn’t done by the end of the current schedule of talks, now extended to March?One thing the Mexican sources are adamant about is if Trump makes good on his threat to start the NAFTA cancellation process as a bargaining ploy, they will refuse to negotiate under that pressure — and would rather let the U.S. withdraw.They said it’s impossible to negotiate with such a metaphorical gun to the temple; every concession would be seen as Mexico caving. They said they would simply allow the U.S. to walk away, accelerate trade talks with Brazil and Argentina and expand trade with Canada in meat, wheat and energy, where Canadian suppliers would pick up some of the U.S. slack.”There’s the door,” one Mexican said, pointing at an actual door.”We will send a couple of decrees to the Senate (of Mexico) saying that (from) this moment forward, U.S. goods and persons are no longer going to be traded under NAFTA preferential provisions.”Canada has not drawn such a hard line.The politicians leading the talks have attempted to turn down the public pressure. Freeland, Lighthizer and Ildefonso Guajardo skipped this round and will skip another round next month in Washington.They will be back at the table in the next round in Canada, in late January, in Montreal. The politicians will review progress made, and begin assessing next steps for the February and March rounds and what happens thereafter if there’s no deal.The Mexicans say they’re fine to keep negotiating after that — even though there are national elections there and in the U.S.last_img read more

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NAFTAs big sticking point major gaps persist between US Mexico on autos

first_imgWASHINGTON – A clash in visions for the auto industry continued to cast doubt on the likelihood of an imminent NAFTA deal Tuesday as the three main players gathered for what could be a final effort to achieve an agreement this year.Any hope of a deal rests on Mexico and the U.S. bridging that still-significant gap.Sources said Mexico this week presented ideas on auto parts that differed substantially from the American goal at these talks: that is, to benefit production in high-wage jurisdictions.Mexico’s proposal lacked a firm wage standard as the U.S. has demanded, would require less North American content than the U.S. wants, ignored rules on using North American steel and would allow companies a 10-year adjustment period, more than double the proposed U.S. phase-in period.The countries continued to say they were making progress at this round, which is potentially the final opportunity to get an agreement before elections in Mexico and the U.S. leave the talks in a freeze until 2019.When asked how talks were going, Mexico’s lead minister Ildefonso Guajardo said: ”It’s going.”He said the countries were working to find solutions that might accommodate the different countries, which he noted have drastically different economic realities. In particular, Guajardo said the countries were trying to bridge differences on the salary standard.President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner also sounded a positive note as he popped in and out of different sessions at the round, being held across the street from the White House.”Very productive,” Kushner said.Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland used a vivid metaphor to describe the state of the NAFTA negotiations, as countries began a multi-day push to deliver a deal.She likened it to childbirth.”When I was giving birth, one of my midwives said, ‘You never know how long the labour will be, but you know that each contraction is one contraction closer to the baby being born.’ And if I could use such a personal metaphor, that seems to apply to trade negotiations,” she said.”We are definitely making progress. I am not going to predict the day and the minute and the hour that we will be finished.”Mexico and the U.S. are sharply divided over the American plan to credit companies for building cars in wealthier, high-wage countries — in other words, outside Mexico.A Mexico-U.S. meeting to resolve those differences ran overtime on Monday, delaying by a day Freeland’s latest encounter with U.S. counterpart Robert Lighthizer.Sources say Mexico has proposed that 70 per cent of all cars comprise North American parts to avoid a tariff — the U.S. has asked for 75 per cent. But the U.S. also wants a wage guarantee: that 40 per cent of every car be made in places that pay more than $16 an hour.A Canadian union leader present at the talks blamed Mexico for slow-walking efforts at wage reform.Jerry Dias of Unifor suggested that if the current Mexican government won’t agree to boost salaries, perhaps everyone should wait a few months until after the Mexican election and negotiate with the next president.Left-wing candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador currently has a big lead in Mexico’s presidential polls.Dias called low wages in Mexico the central issue of this negotiation — ”the gorilla in the room.” And he said Mexican negotiators seem more interested in keeping salaries low than in helping workers.”You’ve got international American corporations … masquerading as Mexican negotiators. Nobody’s moving on the key issues,” Dias said.”Ultimately Canada and the United States at some time or another are gonna have to join forces and say to Mexico, ‘Here’s what the wages have to be in the auto industry, here’s what the rules have to be.’ And if Mexico flatly refuses then I suggest we should wait until after July 1, when there’s a new Mexican president.”Ultimately we’re gonna have to show Mexico we’re not messing around anymore.”One big unknown is what happens after an agreement on autos and whether the U.S. will soften other demands in order to get a quick deal.The auto rules themselves must be adjusted with care, as seemingly small changes could have a far-reaching.An industry-funded report for the Center for Automotive Research recently estimated that the proposed U.S. changes would amount to a multibillion-dollar tax on consumers, as car companies would face the choice to either abide by tougher new standards, or simply pay the 2.5 per cent vehicle tariff and possibly pass costs onto consumers.last_img read more

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The Latest

first_imgTOKYO — The Latest on Japanese automaker Nissan Motor Co.’s chairman Carlos Ghosn and allegations of financial violations against him (all times local):6:15 p.m.Tokyo prosecutors have offered few details into their case against Nissan Motor Co. chairman Carlos Ghosn.At a news conference Thursday, the deputy chief prosecutor Shin Kukimoto, told reporters Ghosn has been allowed to meet with officials from the French Embassy and with a lawyer, though his counsel is not permitted to attend questioning.Ghosn and another Nissan executive, Greg Kelly, were arrested Monday on suspicion of violating financial reporting laws and other alleged misconduct.Kukimoto said Ghosn was being treated just like any other detainee, with three meals a day and eight hours of sleep.He said the allegations of falsification of financial reporting carry heavy penalties because they distort markets and violate listed company’s requirements for transparency.___1:40 p.m.Nissan’s board will meet Thursday to decide whether to dismiss its chairman Carlos Ghosn following his arrest on suspicion of underreporting his income.Earlier this week, alliance partner Renault voted to keep him as its chief executive but appointed an interim chief.Nissan Motor Co. Chief Executive Hiroto Saikawa appears determined to oust Ghosn, who is suspected of under-reporting $44.6 million in income from 2011 to 2015.Nissan’s board consists of nine members, including Ghosn and a representative director named Greg Kelly, who also was arrested Monday on suspicion he collaborated with Ghosn in false financial reporting.Ghosn is being held at a detention centre in Tokyo. Prosecutors sought permission Wednesday to detain him for at least 10 more days as they investigate his case.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Province accepting comments on proposed conservancy near Halfway River First Nation

first_imgLast March, the Province and the First Nation signed an agreement which included that the two parties work together to recommend that a conservancy be established in an area of high cultural significance to the community. The Province is seeking to understand how this proposal may impact third parties and the public.An open house will be held on Wednesday, April 25, in Room 202 at Northern Lights College in Fort St. John from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m..Written comments can also be mailed or emailed to:Lisa BrockMinistry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development100 – 10003 110th Ave.Fort St. John, B.C.V1J 6M7Email: Lisa.Brock@gov.bc.caComments will be accepted until May 25th. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The provincial government said today that it will be accepting comments from the public on the proposed new Tsaa Nuna conservancy, located next to the Halfwat River First Nation, until May 25th.The proposed Tsaa Nuna conservancy is located 65 kilometres northwest of Fort St. John and 35 kilometres northeast of Butler Ridge Provincial Park, and would cover an area of 5,975 hectares along the southern shore of Halfway River.The conservancy is intended to protect the high cultural values and wildlife habitats of the area. The land within the proposed conservancy is of historic and continuing significance for the practice of Treaty Rights by members of the Halfway River First Nation.last_img read more

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RCMP to review arrests at BC pipeline blockade create temporary detachment

first_imgHe says one person secured themselves to a barricade, while two others attached themselves to the underside of a bus that was blocking access to a bridge and another was suspended in a hammock from the bridge.Stubbs says he understands there are concerns about the RCMP’s actions and its review will produce recommendations to address any issues, though he says none have been found yet.The RCMP reached an agreement with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs last Thursday to allow Coastal GasLink workers across the bridge, and Stubbs says the Mounties will bring in a temporary detachment to the area.(THE CANADIAN PRESS) SURREY, B.C. – The RCMP will review the actions of its officers who arrested 14 people at an Indigenous pipeline blockade in northwestern British Columbia last week.The Mounties enforced a court injunction Jan. 7 allowing Coastal GasLink workers and contractors access to a work site where a natural gas pipeline is planned.Assistant commissioner Eric Stubbs says the situation was challenging and emotional, and he alleges the protesters’ actions toward police ranged from passive resistance to “actual assaultive behaviour.”last_img read more

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Conservative candidate walks back alarm on 50K carbon tax for her church

first_img“This is still a sizable sum for a not-for-profit that is already dealing with the burden of increased costs, and I do not think the impact should be downplayed,” she wrote.Steve Pahl, lead pastor with Hillcrest Evangelical Missionary Church in Medicine Hat, said the comments came out after a Sunday service.“We spoke to our congregation about increases to our overall church operating costs,” Pahl said in a statement.“We stated that in recent years there has been an increase to our overall operating costs of about $50,000 per year. The carbon tax was used as one example of the kind of increases we have incurred.“Someone misunderstood that to mean the carbon tax was responsible for the entire $50,0000 increase and tweeted about it.“For us the carbon tax is not a political issue. We are more than happy to pay our bills, whatever they are and need to be. Many people in our congregation are concerned about environmental issues.” Glasgo stirred up controversy on Twitter Sunday after she mistakenly reported the $50,000 number.Her post was met with a series of mocking online responses comparing her to the duplicitous Pinocchio and demanding she name the church and provide proof of the tax bill.UCP Leader Jason Kenney initially defended her post, noting that it’s one of many such financial hardship stories he is hearing.In the first of two followup Facebook posts Monday morning, Glasgo doubled down on her initial Tweet, saying that the church is very large, with adjoining facilities that extend beyond the main area of worship. EDMONTON, A.B. – A candidate for Alberta’s United Conservatives who stirred up controversy by announcing her church is facing a $50,000 carbon tax bill this year now says the actual number is about one-tenth of that.“I reported the initial figure in good faith and did not intend to mislead,” Michaela Glasgo said in a Facebook post Monday.But Glasgo, the UCP candidate for Brooks-Medicine Hat, said the carbon levy is still too high _ even at the revised figure of $5,400.center_img “People can mock if they like,” she wrote.Three hours after that post, however, Glasgo sent out a second Facebook post detailing her discussion with the church and the church’s estimated carbon tax bill of $5,443.The carbon tax was introduced in 2017 by Premier Rachel Notley’s government. It taxes gasoline to drive as well as natural gas to heat homes and businesses. Rebates are available for low and middle-income earners.Kenney has signalled it will be the centrepiece issue of their campaign in the upcoming spring election.Kenney says Notley never campaigned on introducing the tax when she won government in 2015. He adds that the tax only hurts workers and families while failing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and is symbolic of an interventionist, misguided NDP.He has promised the first task of a new UCP government would be to repeal the carbon tax.Environment ministry spokesman Matt Dykstra, in a statement, said the Glasgo contretemps speaks to a larger concern with the UCP.“All candidates for public office and their leaders have a responsibility to check the facts and think critically before sharing information on social media,” said Dykstra.“Time and time again Jason Kenney and the UCP have shown a blatant disregard for the truth in pursuit of pushing misinformation to stir anger.“It’s a divisive, Trump-esque political strategy unbecoming of someone who is seeking to hold the highest public office in our province.”Christine Myatt, spokesperson for the UCP, said the NDP should not cast stones.“I would point out that the NDP wilfully shares misinformation about the UCP on a regular basis,” said Myatt in a statement.“Ms. Glasgo made an honest error and had no intention of misleading the public.”last_img read more

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