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Manchester City Bemoan Unfair Advantage Over Festive Fixtures

first_imgLondon: Manchester City believe the sporting integrity of the Premier League has been compromised by the scheduling of a hectic festive period that will see the English champions play twice in less than 48 hours.City’s game at Wolves has been pushed back from Boxing Day to December 27, kicking off at 7.45pm (1845 GMT). That gives them less than two days to prepare for their game at home to Sheffield United, now set for 6pm on December 29.The change to the Wolves fixture also means Nuno Espirito Santo’s men will have 24 hours less to rest ahead of their trip to City’s title rivals Liverpool on December 29.Liverpool already hold an eight-point lead over City at the top of the table.”Premier League games are a huge physical demand, and it’s not ideal to be made to play twice in less than 48 hours because it doesn’t give the players time to properly recover,” City’s chief operating officer Omar Berrada told the Manchester Evening News.”We also need to make sure that we protect the players’ wellbeing, the sporting integrity of the league, and the quality of the product.”We’ve had an open dialogue with the league to consider other options, but ultimately, we will have to comply with the kick off times and dates as they have been presented to us.”Liverpool fans are also unhappy at the fixture announcement made on Thursday as they face the trip to Leicester for an 8pm kick-off on Boxing Day, a national holiday with limited public transport available.”The latest round of televised Premier League games has been announced and once again there is scant, if any, consideration given to match-going supporters and those employed at the stadiums,” Liverpool fans group the Spirit of Shankly said in a statement.”The Premier League and TV companies repeatedly ignore the welfare of supporters. But they do have a chance to redeem themselves.”Spirit of Shankly call on the authorities to do the right thing and revert all Boxing Day fixtures to a sensible kick-off time.”Supporters groups had already been angered by the delay in releasing the fixtures, which were originally scheduled to be announced on October 11.”These fixtures are five days late. This impacts on family arrangements, the price of train tickets, the ability to book leave and much more,” said the Chelsea Supporters’ Trust.”It is especially sensitive over Christmas, when match-going fans already have challenges regarding fitting in with family arrangements.” footballliverpoolmanchester cityPremier League First Published: October 18, 2019, 10:38 PM IST Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time.last_img read more

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Euro 2016: Turkey coach rues missed chance in Croatia defeat

first_imgTurkey coach Fatih Terim was left to rue a missed chance in the first half of their Euro 2016 Group D defeat by Croatia, which he believes would have changed the outcome of Sunday’s match.Ozan Tufan’s downward header was blocked on the line by Danijel Subasic as Turkey had the first clear chance of the match at the Parc des Princes, before Croatia scored the game’s only goal through Luka Modric.”If Ozan had scored (this goal), the outcome of the match would have been different,” Terim told a news conference.”I thought we would have more possession. The first half was balanced.”Modric put Croatia in front with a superb 25-metre volley from a hooked clearance four minutes before the break.Turkey created very little as they searched for a way back into the game after the interval, while Croatia pushed for a second goal, coming close when Darijo Srna’s free kick brushed the bar.”We had the best chance in the first half but it was not the case after the break,” said Terim.”We were dominated physically, we dropped after about an hour.”Turkey, who are playing in their first major tournament since they reached the semi-finals at Euro 2008 by beating Croatia on penalties in the last eight, face an uphill battle to qualify for the last-16, with matches to come against holders Spain and the Czech Republic.”We will learn our lesson,” Terim added.”Some players need to make more effort, I expected better from them. We will keep fighting.”advertisementlast_img read more

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Sony’s Xperia XZ, X Compact have new design, better cameras and adaptive charging

first_imgSony just announced a couple of more Xperia smartphones – the Xperia XZ and the Xperia X Compact – ahead of IFA 2016, in Berlin. While the Xperia XZ is follow-up to the Xperia X Performance, the Xperia X Compact is a compact variant of the Xperia X. Both the new Xperia phones boast of a new design language, better cameras and adaptive charging technology.Both the phones come with what Sony calls loop surface design. They have been “designed with a surface that’s apparently seamless, looping around the phone in a continuous flow giving a pure, uncluttered look,” according to the company. While the Xperia XZ is carved out of glass and metal, the Xperia X Compact is essentially all-plastic.Both the Xperia XZ and Xperia X Compact sport a 23-megapixel rear camera with Exmor RS for mobile image sensor, triple image sensing technology, predictive hybrid autofocus and 0.6 sec quick launch and capture. There is however no optical image stabilisation. While the premiere Xperia XZ comes with a 13-megapxiel front-camera, the Xperia X Compact has a 5-megapixel camera on the front.Also Read: Sony Xperia X review: Stakes are high, so is the priceBoth the phones come with side-mounted fingerprint scanners and USB Type-C port for charging and data syncing. The Xperia XZ also comes with water-resistance capabilities.While the Xperia XZ comes with a 5.2 FullHD curved display, the Xperia X Compact has a 4.6-inch HD display. The Xperia XZ is powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820 processor clubbed with 3GB RAM and 32GB of internal memory which is further expandable via microSD card. The Xperia X Compact on the other hand is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 650 processor coupled with 3GB RAM and 32GB of memory which is again expandable.Both the phones run Android Marshmallow-based Xperia UI and support 4G LTE, alongside dualSIM capabilities. They also support what Sony calls as adaptive charging. “The Xperia XZ and Xperia X Compact use intelligent charging to prevent battery decline. They learn your charging patterns and adapt to them, resulting in up to twice the battery lifespan,” claims the company.advertisementThe Xperia XZ will be available in the colours: Mineral Black, Forest Blue, and Platinum while the Xperia X Compact will come in Universe Black, Mist Blue, and White.last_img read more

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N’Golo Kanté’s manic commitment helps Chelsea rattle Manchester City

first_img Pep Guardiola calls Manchester City’s defeat to Chelsea a ‘good lesson’ Chelsea Reuse this content Share on Pinterest Read more Somehow Chelsea blocked and covered and kept their goal intact. On the right Kanté stayed closer to Jorginho than he has, but without much control or synergy between the two. The story here looked like becoming the same old story, the one where the light-blue shirts simply take the day away.Before this game there had already been some cautious talk about City going the Premier League season unbeaten. Football has always had wonky sense of humour. In the event a team who breathe and sweat and burp out goals in their sleep were outscored by a midfielder with two Premier League goals since September 2016; with a second added by David Luiz, who was solid and orderly where he seemed to be playing in great flapping brown clown shoes against Tottenham a fortnight ago.Two wonderful passes made Kanté’s goal just before half‑time. First David Luiz pinged a hard flat crossfield missile from the left-back position on to the foot of the scampering Pedro. The ball found its way to Eden Hazard, who did something sublime, waiting a beat, allowing the players in front of him to move, then rolling the ball into a paddock of space he alone seemed to have spotted.Kanté is of course borderline psychic when it comes to reading the flow of the ball in tight spaces. As the ball trickled across he came rushing in off his right-half position to slam it high into the net past Ederson. Share on Twitter Manchester City Share on Facebook features Read more Share on LinkedIn Stamford Bridge had been a chilly, breezy boisterous place before kick-off, the air lashed with tongues of fire from the pitchside flamethrowers. As a right-sided player Kanté looked like a very good central defensive shield in those opening exchanges, intercepting the ball then finding himself robbed, or his passes misplaced.An hour later Kanté had begun to surge down the right wing like an auxiliary wing-back, three times finding holes outside Fabian Delph. And something did shift here. City were still sublime on the ball but Sarri’s plan to hold a deep line and hustle hard kept them at arm’s length. Meanwhile Kanté showed that every plan can be made to work with a little willing; a player who remains the most generous of professionals, a lesson in willing, warrior spirit and pure footballing intelligence.center_img Share via Email Chelsea and police investigate claims of racist abuse aimed at Raheem Sterling Share on Messenger The goal was Chelsea’s first shot on target. It was also Kanté’s most assured touch of a half that had seen him reduced to a frantic figure at the edge of things. Kanté had been dispossessed four times. He had skittered about wildly in search of a space to fill, a tackle to make. He had completed nine passes. And yet, as ever he had just kept on coming.There has already been a great deal of harrumphing about Sarri’s attempts to play Kanté in a slightly different role, replacing him in the centre with the more ponderous, more artful Jorginho.Understandably so. Kanté has been a darling of the Premier League, where his spidey-sense for interceptions and brilliance in the clinches have fitted the tempo and texture of the game so well. It is an easy issue to jump on. We can all see what Kanté does. We can all see that Jorginho is another kind of player. Infamy! Coming over here, confusing our much-loved French defensive pivots.This is of course not quite as simple as some would make it. To ask Sarri to move Jorginho from the base of his midfield is to ask him to abandon the sense of how he wants his team to play. It is to ask him to stop doing the things that brought him here, the deep passing game that is central to his plans.Pep Guardiola had a similar reaction in his first year in England. How, we shrieked, could he persist with this tactic of dinking it around at the back? Why weren’t there more tackles? Except, without that process he wouldn’t have created the most sublime club football machine of the last few seasons. Time: it is the one thing English football refuses to give you. How do you solve a problem like N’Golo? On the evidence of a bruising, thrilling night at Stamford Bridge, Maurizio Sarri’s attempts to transform the best covering midfielder in the world into a withdrawn right-sider may or may not succeed. But it won’t be for want of manically committed effort from the man himself, who provided a lesson in making a plan work, even when that plan seems to push you to the fringes.For the opening 44 minutes of this 2-0 Chelsea win Manchester City had eased around like a swarm of blue-shirted princelings, scything through what was once Kanté country. Just past the half hour there was a beautiful moment as Riyad Mahrez walked one way in the centre circle, then shuffled back the other, making Antonio Rüdiger hare off into the wrong movie set, a man suddenly speaking the wrong lines and dancing the wrong steps. Read more Premier League David Luiz seals win as Chelsea end Manchester City’s unbeaten start Share on WhatsApp Sportblog Topicslast_img read more

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Caster Semenya starts ‘new journey’ after joining football team

first_imgShare on Facebook Support The Guardian Club founder and South Africa captain Janine Van Wyk said: “I am absolutely honoured that out of all the other women’s clubs around the world, she has chosen JVW as the club where she would like to start showcasing her football skills.“I welcomed her at her first training [session] with the team on Tuesday and was impressed to see that she definitely has all the fundamentals.”Semenya is not the first athlete to transfer to football – 100m and 200m Olympic champion Usain Bolt did the same after retiring in 2017, joining Stromsgodset in Norway prior to signing for Australia’s Central Coast Mariners. However, it proved to be short stint in Gosford for the sprint icon; he left after only eight weeks at the club.Semenya will not be registered for the 2019 SAFA Sasol League, the league in which JVW play, as the transfer window has shut for the current season. She will train with the team and target being ready to play for them during the 2020 campaign. … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. The two-time Olympic 800m gold medallist Caster Semenya appears to be preparing for a career outside of athletics after joining a women’s football club.The 28-year-old is currently appealing against a decision by the Court of Arbitration for Sport which approved the IAAF’s introduction of a new testosterone limit for female athletes. The governing body introduced the rule change because it argues female athletes with differences of sexual development (DSD) – such as Semenya – have “a competitive advantage”.Under the rule, all athletes with a difference in sex development should reduce their blood testosterone to a specific level for at least six months – and then maintain that for the rest of their athletic career – in order to compete in events from 400m to a mile. Semenya has remained “steadfast in her defiance” to do so and, as such, is unable to defend her 800m world title in Doha later this month without taking hormone-suppressing drugs. So the South African, has started training with Gauteng-based JVW FC with a view to making her debut next season as the transfer window is currently closed.“I am grateful for this opportunity and I appreciate the love and support I already get from the team,” she told the club’s website. “I am looking forward to this new journey, and hopefully I can contribute as much as I can to the club.” Sign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks. Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Since you’re here…center_img news Athletics Caster Semenya Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Share via Email Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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10 months agoReal Madrid’s locker room happy to see back of Ronaldo

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Real Madrid’s locker room happy to see back of Ronaldoby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid’s locker room isn’t missing Cristiano Ronaldo.While they’ve suffered without the Portuguese’s goals, Marca says as a personality, the Juventus striker isn’t missed.Ronaldo only has one friend left at Real – Marcelo – with the rest of the squad happy to see the back of him.The Juve star’s decision to snub the Ballon d’Or ceremony and Luka Modric’s triumph only further convinced Real’s players they’re better off without him.Indeed, there is lingering anger amongst the players that Ronaldo would swerve Modric’s biggest night of his career. last_img read more

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OGC partnering with First Nations on restoration projects

first_imgDuring the summer of 2018, the project working group initiated field sampling and site-specific prescriptions.OGC says earth work followed in the early fall and was completed by the FNFN’s contractor and employees.According to OGC, Native plant seeds collected during the early fall were provided to a local nursery in preparation for spring planting.FNFN Chief, Curtis Dickie, says these projects show that the First Nations are taking environmental responsibilities to the next level, adding that these projects are a great source of employment.“This opportunity is an example of First Nation’s people taking our environmental responsibilities to the next level. These projects will provide our people with employment and with the state of the local economy the partnership is very uplifting and we hope this partnership can be used as an example and create other opportunities to collaborate with the Commission going forward.”Michelle Mungall, Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, says this type of restoration work is part of the reconciliation process with First Nations to build a better future. “Our government is dedicated to reconciliation, and we are working with First Nations to build a better future. With this initiative, we are partnering with the Fort Nelson First Nation to make sure to protect the environment and restore oil and gas sites.”OGC is also working with other Treaty 8 First Nations to launch pilot projects, funded through OGRIS and the Orphan Site Reclamation Fund, to jointly explore restoration practices on orphan oil and gas well sites in their territories. FORT NELSON, B.C. – The B.C. Oil and Gas Commission will be restoring former oil and gas industry sites to their natural state, as part of a partnership with First Nations of Northeastern B.C.The OGC will be restoring former sites by utilizing funding from the B.C. Oil and Gas Research and Innovation Society and will be working with the Fort Nelson First Nation to restore borrow pits in the Clarke Lake area.According to the Commission, they will be restoring the former industry sites by using ecologically suitable and culturally appropriate restoration techniques.last_img read more

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GAIL top bidder for ILFSs 7 operating wind power plants

first_imgMumbai: Debt-laden Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services (IL&FS) Monday said GAIL (India) has emerged as the highest bidder for its seven operating wind power plants. The bidding process to these assets having 12 sites spread across seven states was launched in November last year. “Gail’s offer of approximately Rs 4,800 crore for 100 percent enterprise value contemplates no hair-cut to the debt of the SPVs, aggregating to nearly Rs 3,700 crore,’ the company said in a release. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThese wind power assets have a total generation capacity of 874 MW. The proposal was approved by the committee of creditors of IL&FS Wind Energy (IWEL), majority owner of the SPVs, it said. The company said engagement with the ORIX Japan, the other shareholders in the SPVs, with regard to the proposal is in progress, and the deal is expected to close in three weeks, it said. The sale proceeds will be distributed as per the resolution framework filed with the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLAT) by the government,the company said. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostThe closure of the deal will be subject to approval of Justice (Retd) D K Jain and NCLT. The Uday Kotak-led board of IL&FS group, as part of the resolution process has initiated sale of a number of group assets. Sale process for assets including education, funds, roads and thermal power plant are currently underway and binding financial bids are expected for these companies in stages by May 2019, it said. Under the resolution plan, the government has categorised IL&FS group companies into green, amber and red categories based on their financial position. Firms classified as “green” would continue to meet their payment obligations, while “amber” companies can meet only operational payment obligations to senior secured financial creditors. The “red” firms are the entities which cannot meet their payment obligations at all. Thousands of crores of money of more than 15 lakh employees of both public and private sector companies have exposure to IL&FS bonds. As these investments were classified as unsecured debt, the funds feared that all money would be lost if all market-related risks fell on them.last_img read more

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How major US stock indexes fared Friday

Stocks finished lower on Wall Street Friday amid new concerns about the progress of trade talks between the U.S. and China.The market turned lower in the afternoon after reports said a Chinese trade delegation had cut short a trip to the U.S. The selling, which erased modest early gains for the market, snapped a three-week win streak for the S&P 500. Technology stocks, consumer-focused companies and banks led the sell-off. Bond yields fell.On Friday:The S&P 500 fell 14.72 points, or 0.5%, to 2,992.07.The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 159.72 points, or 0.6%, to 26,935.07.The Nasdaq lost 65.20 points, or 0.8%, to 8,117.67.The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks slid 1.71 points, or 0.1%, to 1,559.76.For the week:The S&P 500 fell 15.32 points, or 0.5%.The Dow lost 284.45 points, or 1.1%.The Nasdaq dropped 59.04 points, or 0.7%.The Russell 2000 slid 18.37 points, or 1.2%.For the year:The S&P 500 is up 485.22 points, or 19.4%.The Dow is up 3,607.61 points, or 15.5%.The Nasdaq is up 1,482.40 points, or 22.3%.The Russell 2000 is up 211.21 points, or 15.7%.The Associated Press read more

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Colombia UN human rights office calls for end to arbitrary detentions

“The office has noted with concern that illegal or arbitrary detentions constitute, both in number and frequency, one of the most worrying violations of human rights reported in the country,” the director of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) office in Colombia, Michael Frühling, said in urging a series of measures to improve the situation. “Such a state of affairs shatters not only the right to personal freedom and security but also the rights to due process and presumption of innocence,” he added yesterday at the presentation of a report on arbitrary detentions prepared by the Colombia-Europe-United States Coordinator, a non-governmental human rights group. Mr. Frühling called for the observance of such basic recommendations as ensuring that detentions take place only with a written judicial warrant and when based on actual evidence and not mere suspicion. “The office is also concerned that mass-scale detentions and individual seizures with no juridical basis frequently affect members of vulnerable groups such as human rights advocates, community leaders, trade union activists and people living in areas where illegal armed groups are active,” he said. “As is well known, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights is firmly convinced that human rights and international humanitarian rights in Colombia can be considerably enhanced if its recommendations are applied, consistently and fully, during 2005,” he added. read more

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UNArab League envoy holds talks on Syrian crisis with Turkish officials

During a meeting in the Turkish city of Istanbul, the three men talked about the adverse effect of the conflict on the region and the urgent need to find a way to stop the bloodshed and alleviate the suffering of the Syrian people, according to a statement issued by Mr. Brahimi’s spokesperson.More than 20,000 people, mostly civilians, have died in Syria since the uprising against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad began some 19 months ago. A further 2.5 million Syrians urgently need humanitarian aid, according to UN estimates.While in Istanbul, Mr. Brahimi also met the Chairman of the opposition Syrian National Council (SNC), Abdel Bassett Sida, and members of the SNC Executive Committee, as well as other members of the Syrian opposition.Mr. Brahimi has been holding talks with leaders in the region, including the Syrian Government, to find a solution to the prolonged crisis. Earlier this week, he met in Jeddah with the King of Saudi Arabia, Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, as well as the Saudi Deputy Foreign Minister, Prince Abdelaziz Bin Abdallah. read more

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Brock profs honoured for work on aboriginal womens history

Two Brock University professors are being lauded by national organizations for their work examining aboriginal and women’s history.Maureen Lux and Carmela Patrias, both of Brock’s Department of History, were celebrated during the annual Congress of Humanities and Social Sciences held at Ryerson University at the end of May.Lux was recognized by the Canadian Historical Association for her latest book, Separate Beds: A History of Indian Hospitals in Canada, which was named Best Book in the Aboriginal History category. Patrias was honoured by the Canadian Committee on Women’s History with the Hilda Neatby Prize for the best article in women’s history. She was recognized for her work entitled, “More Menial Than Housemaids? Racialized and Gendered Labour in the Fruit and Vegetable Industry of Canada’s Niagara Region, 1880-1945.”Lux and her colleague Erika Dyck from the University of Saskatchewan also received the Best Article prize from the Canadian Historical Review for their work entitled, “Population Control in the ‘Global North?’: Canada’s Response to Indigenous Reproductive Rights and Neo-Eugenics.”Honoured by the recognition of her peers, Lux hopes that her book will add to Canadians’ understanding of the roots of some of the inequities indigenous people continue to face.   “We tend to think of 20th century health-care history as the progressive story of the making of Medicare and the heroes who led the way,” Lux said. “At the same time, however, indigenous people were kept separate in underfunded, understaffed and overcrowded ‘indian hospitals’ that were rife with coercion and medical experimentation.”The book, described by the prize committee as a grim story of institutional racism told with compassion, was written to emphasize the “strength and resolve of indigenous communities to improve health care and create a more equal society,” Lux said.In doing the research, she was surprised how few archivists and historians had ever heard of the segregated hospitals, even though, in First Nations communities, most people either experienced the hospitals personally or had family and friends who did.   “Until quite recently, the residential school experience was likewise erased from public memory,” she said.Lux was pleased her Canadian Institutes of Health Research-funded work with Dyck, which received the best article prize, also resonated with fellow historians.The article is part of a book the pair are writing on reproductive politics in the era after Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau liberalized the laws and famously declared the state had no place in the bedrooms of the nation. Their research examines those whose bedrooms became of greater interest to the state.Patrias was also humbled by the recognition for her article, which examines the history of seasonal agricultural workers in Niagara during the First and Second World Wars, as well as the Depression.Her work compares the various marginalized groups who performed this labour in peacetime, women generally known as farmerettes. They included mostly immigrant women from eastern and southern Europe and indigenous families, and the middle-class English Canadian women recruited to do the work during wartime.“The wages and conditions of labour of these groups were strikingly different,” Patrias said.“Immigrant and aboriginal workers were paid very low wages for this back-breaking labour, housed in inferior accommodation and eyed with suspicion in Niagara,” she said. “Privileged by their class and racial background, English Canadian women were welcomed with open arms in Niagara communities.”As a result, the latter group received higher wages, better housing, prepared meals and was commended on their wartime sacrifice — although their wages were still kept deliberately below those of male workers.Patrias said the article was intended to share the little known history of the female agricultural labourers who played an integral role in Canada’s fruit and vegetable industry.“I hope people will appreciate the contribution of women, indigenous and other racialized workers, and also understand more about the process of racialization and gendering as bases of inequality,” she said.Patrias, who is nearing retirement, said the award is especially meaningful because of her longstanding interest in women’s history. read more

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Neptec data for Trimbles mine information solutions

first_imgTrimble and Neptec Technologies have announced that Trimble will distribute Neptec’s obscurant-penetrating laser scanners (OPAL) and 3D real-time intelligence (3DRi) software. In addition, Trimble plans to integrate data from Neptec’s scanners and software with Trimble’s geospatial and enterprise-level mine information solutions for the mining industry. Neptec’s OPAL and 3DRi technologies can be used for real-time sensing, high-resolution data capture, and recognition of features and assets. OPAL scanners provide sensing technologies for an accurate view of surroundings and 3DRi software provides intelligence to interpret that input and dynamically track the situation. Adding the OPAL laser scanner to Trimble’s mining solutions expands Trimble’s 3D laser scanning capability to offer improved data capture and penetration through dust, snow, rain and fog and to operate in high air particulate conditions common in mines.“With operating margins continuously being squeezed, our mining customers are increasingly looking for new technology solutions to measure and optimise the performance of their operations in real time,” said Nathan Pugh, Business Area Director of Trimble’s Mining Division. “The unique ability of Neptec’s OPAL 3D LiDAR to capture a real-time 3D view of a harsh and dynamic mine environment, and then extract actionable information without the need for extensive manual post-processing of the data, enables many new geospatial data-driven applications in functional areas such as drill and blast, haulage and materials processing for mining.”“OPAL and 3DRi are a first step in our broader strategy to adapt over 20 years of technology innovation for clients such as NASA and the Canadian Space Agency for commercial use on Earth,” said Mike Sekerka, CEO of Neptec Technologies. “Interest in our technology and products by industry leaders like Trimble is a tremendous validation of our commercialization strategy.”Neptec Technologies develops innovative 3D sensor-driven solutions for automation and robotics applications in harsh environments. The company was founded in 2011 to commercialise space-technologies developed by Neptec Design Group, an award-winning space flight technology company and NASA prime contractor. Its first products are a family of obscurant-penetrating laser scanners (OPAL) and a software development tool kit (3DRi) with advanced features such as automatic change detection and object recognition and tracking. The picture shows OPAL scan of haul trucks spotting in an open-pit mine (2 seconds).last_img read more

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The Best in SciFi Books This Week 83118

first_imgScience Fiction in all its forms has become such a part of our society and bridged the gap from niche genre to pop culture phenomenon. There is something for everyone if you dig deep enough. The Wailing Blade is a great new comic series. There are a ton of amazing Sci-Fi TV shows to binge right now. Observe the best eclipses in Sci-Fi history too. You’ll find something you love in the world of Science Fiction for sure right here.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on target After starting off strong last week, the world of science-fiction had a bit of slump. Luckily the lack of glittering awards ceremonies made me ask what other aspects of the sci-fi genre would folks coming to a weekly round-up like to see? The answer, of course, is essays. But first! What’s new this week.Reading RecommendationsThis week’s options include a novelette about first contact gone wrong and the beginning of what might be the next great sci-fi saga.The Kite MakerAt a brisk 32 pages, The Kite Maker by Brenda Peynado comes in at the low price of $.99. But don’t let the length fool you. The Kite Maker follows the story of an alien and human struggling to overcome fear and human-created genocide through a love of kites. While an allegory for the terrible things man is capable of when afraid isn’t new ground, it’s a trait we would do well to remember we have. It’s a great quick read for the week.MirageAlso out this week is Mirage by Somaiya Daud. The young adult novel begins “On a small moon orbiting a large planet, in a small farmhouse in a small village, there was a box, and in this box was a feather.” The tale is that of Amani, teenager who lives a quiet life under the rule of the Vathek Empire. Amani is pulled into adventure when she is kidnapped for her striking resemblance to the Princess Maram. Whether she wants to or not, Amani must find a way to survive being the princess’s body double, the quiet viciousness of court life, and her burgeoning feelings for the princess’ fiancé. Entertainment BuzzIt’s a great time to love genre adaptations as Hollywood has a voracious appetite for them. This week is no different. The Swedish sci-fi novel Aniara by Nobel Prize-winning author Harry Martinson will make its film debut at TIFF. Aniara records the tale of settlers on their way to Mars who are blown off course. Directed by Pella Kågerman and Hugo Lilja, Aniara has already been picked up for distribution by Film Constellation.Meanwhile, on the television side of things, The Swarm by Frank Schaetzing has been picked up by German broadcaster ZDF. The Swarm will air in eight parts. The narrative blends ecological warning with hard science-fiction. Marine animals the world over began to act strangle coupled with the appearance of millions of worms of an unknown species breaking free from Arctic ice set off alarm bells the world over. Scientists quickly discover the unfathomable; humanity isn’t the only intelligent life on Earth, and the deep-sea civilization has had it with us. Game of Thrones executive producer Frank Doegler is financing the project, with Uma Thurman set to star. So expect to see The Swarm on American TV as well, though no date has been set.Further ReadingBlack Mirror’s “San Junipero,” was peak sci-fi romance.Looking for more sci-fi musings? Then you probably enjoy think piece essays. You’re in luck, because those are internet specialties. This week Wired.com has an ode to the evolution of the science-fiction romance by Pia Ceres entitled, “The Pleasure and Promise of the Sci-Fi Romance.”If you need something a little more cerebral, try on Molly Flatt‘s essay for The Guardian. “Is the Future Female? Fixing Sci-Fi’s Women Problem” plums the depths of ingrained misogyny in the genre and how even female authors need to examine how and why the determine the personalities and physical characteristics of the heroines and villainesses.center_img Netflix Axes ‘The OA’ Sci-Fi Series After 2 Seasons‘Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ Becomes Mostly Harm… last_img read more

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22 KPBSD School Sites To Host Budget Development Forum

first_imgAt 6:00pm, on Tuesday, October 30, KPBSD school principals will meet with site-councils and the public after a live video-streamed presentation from the district to all 22 school sites in the district. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The process is rolling forward for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 budget planning process for the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District. Participant input will be synthesized and presented to the KPBSD school board during future board meetings and work sessions.Link: KPBSD Finance Department Pegge Erkeneff, KPBSD Communications Liaison: “This year in particular we’re really focusing on site councils and everybody that has any interests in ours schools, or concerned about our school remaining high quality schools should come out to one of our site councils.” center_img Erkeneff: “We will video stream from the district office, and then after the video stream locally at each site the principal will be meeting with the community that is gathered there for that school.” According to Erkeneff, the meeting will provide an opportunity to learn about reductions which have been considered in the past—some implemented, some not—as well as potential new or additional revenue will be explored.last_img read more

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Game of Thrones season 8 episode 6 FINAL scene A White Walker

first_imgPeter Dinklage as Tyrion LannisterHBOGame of Thrones will soon be airing its final season and fans may very well be realizing that this is indeed the end of their favourite show. So, in the spirit of goodbyes, we have the apparent description of the final scene that will wrap the final season of Game of Thrones.Be warned. Spoilers abound.The final episode winds down with a scene in the far far North, in the Lands of Always Winter. A single White Walker apparently rides to and brings the body of Bran Stark to an altar.It is known that the Night King stabbed Bran in episode 2. He was stabbed in the heart with Dragonglass. The White Walker seemingly performs a certain ritual and Bran opens his eyes, they’re apparently bright blue. The White Walker apparently puts a crown on Bran’s head and the altar slowly changes into one of ice.  Bran Stark is the Night KingFacebookThat is quite an ominous ending to the show and we have to say, leaves things a bit open-ended. Could there be a continuation of the story in a sequel series? We know that HBO is planning a prequel series but Game of Thrones has been too much of a success for HBO to just end it. Maybe we can expect a sequel to Game of Thrones in a couple of years. But for now, we’ll just have to make do with the final six episodes of the final season of Game of Thrones. The cast and crew of the show has apparently been saying their goodbyes.The final season of Game of Thrones will air in April. We can’t wait for the final season of Game of Thrones.last_img read more

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Australia road crash kills 3 Bangladeshis

first_imgRoad Accident logoAt least three Bangladeshi nationals were killed on Saturday in a road accident at Kakadu Highway in Darwin, the capital city of Northern Territory of Australia.The accident took place at 12.30pm on Saturday, reports news agency UNB quoting ABC News.Seven young people – all believed to be members of the Top End’s Bangladeshi student community – were travelling from Jabiru to Cooinda in a Toyota Landcruiser on Saturday afternoon when it crashed on the Kakadu Highway.Four women were injured in the crash and are in a stable condition in Royal Darwin hospital, the report said.NT police acting assistant commissioner commander Tony Fuller said the accident occurred when the 29-year-old driver lost control on a large, sweeping bend.Two of the injured people might have limbs amputated, and another had a severe head injury, police said.“The two rear passengers were able to escape, the driver and front passenger were unable to escape, and they have died at the scene,” police said.last_img read more

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Panasonic tech fixes color setbacks in low light photos w video

first_imgNishiwaki made special note of something called Babinet-BPM: “We’ve developed a completely new analysis method, called Babinet-BPM. Compared with the usual FDTD method, the computation speed is 325 times higher, but it only consumes 1/16 of the memory. This is the result of a three-hour calculation by the FDTD method. We achieved the same result in just 36.9 seconds.”FDTD stands for finite-difference time-domain and BPM stands for beam propagation method. Both are numerical analysis techniques. Panasonic’s work is also described in Nature Photonics, in a study called “Efficient colour splitters for high-pixel-density image sensors.” The authors said, “We experimentally demonstrate that this principle of colour splitting based on near-field deflection can generate color images with minimal signal loss.” Citation: Panasonic tech fixes color setbacks in low light photos (w/ video) (2013, March 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-panasonic-tech-setbacks-photos-video.html “Conventional color image sensors use a Bayer array [the arrangement of color filters used in imaging sensors in digital cameras, camcorders, and scanners to create a color image]. The filter pattern is 50 percent green, 25 percent red and 25 percent blue in which a red, green, or blue light-transmitting filter is placed above each sensor. These filters block 50 to 70 percent of the incoming light before it even reaches the sensor,” according to a Panasonic release. Seeing demand for higher-sensitivity cameras on the rise, Panasonic sought a new solution to enable sensors to capture “uniquely vivid” color images. In the video, Seiji Nishiwaki commented further: “Here, color filters aren’t used. So light can be captured without loss, which enables us to achieve approximately double the sensitivity.”Nishiwaki said Panasonic’s technology can be used on different types of sensors, whether CCD, CMOS, or BSI and can be in step with current semiconductor fabrication processes. He said the new approach would not require any special materials or processes.According to DigInfo TV: “The image sensor uses two types of color splitters: red deflectors and blue deflectors.The red and blue deflectors are arranged diagonally, with one of each for every four pixels. RGB values can be obtained by determining the intensity of light reaching each of the four pixels. For example, if white light enters each pixel, pixels where it doesn’t pass through a deflector receive unmodified white light. But in pixels with a red deflector, the light is split into red diffracted light and cyan non-diffracted light. And when white light passes through a blue deflector, it’s split into blue diffracted light and yellow non-diffracted light. As a result, the pixel arrangement is cyan, white + red, white + blue, and yellow. The RGB values are then calculated using a processing technique designed specifically for mixed color signals.” © 2013 Phys.org Panasonic develops a next-generation robust image sensor (Phys.org) —Panasonic’s new color filtering technology is in the news this week after a video from DigInfo TV presented what imaging experts at Panasonic have been up to, and that is using “micro color splitters,” which achieve twice the brightness than before possible. These micro color splitters replace a traditional filter array over the image sensor. The result from the new approach is especially relevant for those working with low light photography—situations wherever there is less than daytime light outside, or any indoor photography without much ambient light. The researchers found their new approach could almost double the brightness in photos taken in low light environments. Saying no to traditional color filters, the researchers wanted a technique where light is captured without any loss. More information: Nature Photonics paper: www.nature.com/nphoton/journal … photon.2012.345.htmlVia Diginfo.tv Journal information: Nature Photonics Explore further The problem has been that image sensors have produced color pictures by using red, green, and blue filters for each pixel, but with that system, 50 percent to 70 percent of the light is lost. The micro color splitters control the diffraction of light at a microscopic level. Panasonic’s imaging experts said that they achieved approximately double the color sensitivity in comparison with conventional sensors that use color filters. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Montreal set to break tourism records by end of summer

first_imgMontreal is all set to record its highest number of visitors ever this summer, thanks to a number of festivals as well as the city’s 375th-anniversary celebrations and Canada’s 150th birthday bash.According to Tourism Montreal Vice President, Pierre Bellerose, if the trend so far this summer continues, the city could see 11 million visitors.Bellerose believes a number of new initiatives have helped boost Montreal’s profile, from new attractions to festival buzz. “We have new flights, direct flights, from China for example, which has brought a greater numbers of Chinese tourists to Montreal,” he said.The city’s 375th-anniversary celebrations have helped, too, Bellerose said.Tourism Montreal says last year visitors spent $3 billion and the group expects that amount to increase this year by up to six percent.last_img read more

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